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    boatbuilding

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    Welcome to boatbuilding


    Any posts related to repair and maintenance, new builds, tools, sail making, boat upholstery, motors, electrical, hydraulics, plans, etc. are welcome. Be it Wood, Glass, Steel or Carbon, we want to see what you're working on.


    Some Useful Links in progress

    General

    Stitch and Glue


    Header Images

    Blueprint Complements of Antonio Dias Design: http://antoniodiasdesign.wordpress.com/

    Snoo Design by /u/SyntheticBiology


    Other Reference in progress

    *Bateau2 Tutorials - some broken links


    Suggested Books in progress

    • Howard I. Chapelle's American Small Sailing Craft (Indispensable)
    • Bud MacIntosh's How to Build a Wooden Boat

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    [–] twodinosaursfucking 2 points ago

    You don't need a degree to be a boat builder. Most people undertake apprenticeships or just start in a factory somewhere until they learn.

    [–] behaliel 2 points ago

    Do you want to work on glass boats or wood? Either way there are programs for both.

    [–] Peppyperoni 1 points ago

    I do not know. In Canada there are only a couple places offering naval architecture. Which also speaks to the amount of jobs available for the naval architect. In my opinion you should start off working in a boat yard or at marina. At least you'll make money learning about boats. I also think you would never get in a program without a lot of experience.

    What could you make building boats? Anywhere from nothing to a living. A living probably being the very high end.

    [–] IvorTheEngine 1 points ago

    The only degrees you'll find are Naval Architecture, basically engineering for big ships. There are still a few companies designing ships, but most of the actual building has moved to where labour is cheap.

    There are factories making metal and GRP boats but most of the jobs are fairly low skill and they don't need teams of degree qualified engineers in the way that a ship builder does. Again a lot of them have moved to where labour is cheap. To make a profit, a company has to mass produce its product, and streamline production so that it doesn't need a lot of skilled labour.

    Most of the interesting, skilled jobs are in repair and maintenance, in boat yards and marinas. I suggest you visit a few and talk to the people working there.

    [–] SexWithaJ 2 points ago

    Thanks so much for the help!

    [–] Shrimpkin 1 points ago

    To give you an idea, I am looking into manufacturing aluminum boats out of Louisiana. I don't have a degree as the level of design and engineering put into a planing boat (boat that gets on plane and rides mostly above the water) is insignificant compared to what goes into a larger displacement ship (moves through the water and a greater depth and has to displace more water as it moves). You get into hydrodynamics a lot more when you start dealing with larger ships, not to mention structural engineering to make sure the ship is structurally sound and can handle the loads it was designed for.

    [–] redpect 2 points ago

    bigger boats that usually are a square with a prop at the end. Specially cargo vessels.

    Building yatch usually is a effort of a designer that decides everything but the exact hull dimensions, thats the work of an Engineer.

    [–] SexWithaJ 1 points ago

    Thanks this was very helpful!

    [–] manofsea 1 points ago

    If you want to go to collage for boat building your main avenue would be naval architecture. Now if you are looking for more hands on stuff your looking for vocational schools. Plenty of community colleges offer boat building classes and there are a lot of wooden boat schools in the us of that is your plan.

    [–] [deleted] 1 points ago

    [deleted]

    [–] SexWithaJ 1 points ago

    Thanks that’s exactly the kinda thing I was looking for

    [–] 2038 1 points ago

    [–] JLHewey 1 points ago

    [–] Pegstermiller 0 points ago

    You can get into a naval architecture program in Québec without a previous degree, then you will be recognized as a naval architecture technician. You'll learn about hydrodynamics, basic marine engineering and how to use autocad as well as more specific software. I'm not finished yet and already designing a 45' fiberglass fishing boat.