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    Astrokiwi

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    [–] Stan Lee meeting Stan Lee Astrokiwi 1 points ago in pics

    The plural of "iron" is "ira", like with "taxon" and "bacon".

    [–] Copied from Twitter, deserves to be here Astrokiwi 2 points ago in HumansBeingBros

    I still find it weird that people ever believed that to be unequivocally true. There was that Newsroom speech about why America isn't the greatest country in the world "anymore", but even that was (a) presented as something that would sound shocking to people, and (b) still used the phrase "anymore", implying that America used to be the Greatest Country in the World but has lost its way somehow.

    It just seems like such a silly thing to believe. There are loads of modern western capitalist democracies that are all pretty good. America has a lot of specific things that it is in first place for - it is the single biggest economy on the planet, it dominates popular culture, and it has the biggest military on the planet. But of course there are plenty of other countries that are first place for other things, and there are plenty of things that are bad in the US - compared to other 1st world countries, the US has a fairly high violent crime rate (especially with firearms), doesn't have great social mobility (though that depends where you are), and so on.

    Like, I'm fine with people being proud of their countries, but thinking that your country is literally and factually the greatest in the world overall just seems silly to me. I'm not even sure if it's really a meaningful concept in the first place, given how complex a country is and how different people's values are.

    [–] Is it possible for a moon's orbital period to coincide with its planet's revolution in a way that causes a "new moon" that could last for years? Astrokiwi 1 points ago in askscience

    What's more likely is that a planets rotation can be tidally locked to its moon, so that the time it takes for the moon to orbit is exactly one "day". Then the moon is just fixed in the same position in the sky all year round, depending only on your position on the surface.

    [–] Saying " That's an unusual spelling" Rather than pointing out that a parent has misspelled their new babies name. Astrokiwi 197 points ago * (lasted edited 20 hours ago) in britishproblems

    In New Zealand they can actually stop you from naming your kid something if it's particularly stupid, misleading, or offensive.

    Edit: Forgot which sub I was on. There's probably rules about it here in the UK too - like I doubt it's okay to name your kid "Your Majesty The Queen"

    [–] How do you guys feel about the genre of "exploration shooters"? Astrokiwi 2 points ago in truegaming

    Yeah I remember it feeling really innovative that in Quake you could open doors without hitting anything

    [–] Sorry, lads only Astrokiwi 1 points ago in CasualUK

    I think it's actually something that's more common if you're quite fluent in a language. Like I've seen Québecois mix up "fermer", "fermez", and "fermé" more than beginner anglo learners, and I've never seen "your" and "you're" mixed up by a Chinese international student.

    [–] Sorry, lads only Astrokiwi 1 points ago in CasualUK

    It's weird how you can 100% know the difference between two homonyms, but still end up accidentally writing the wrong one down, even without autocorrect.

    This particular one probably happens less with people who are actually from the UK though - as a New Zealander, "air" and "ear" are pronounced exactly the same, but I think that UKers would be more likely to distinguish them.

    [–] Question about passing slice of array to subroutine Astrokiwi 1 points ago in fortran

    Though more modern languages are often going to be less strict on this sort of thing than Fortran. Fortran is somewhat C-like in this regard - in C you can be even more flexible with arrays, because they're just pointers to blocks of memory.

    [–] It’s the worst when you stop playing a game and are most of the way through. Then you return to being lost and up against great challenges Astrokiwi 16 points ago in patientgamers

    One of the issues is with games that take a lot of reflexy skill, because you lose those skills when you've been away from the game for a while. With something like FNV, the advancement is in your character's stats, so you can still just murder things with VATS even if you can't really remember where you are.

    [–] Sorry, lads only Astrokiwi 27 points ago in CasualUK

    The thing about fart bubbles is they always try to walk it in

    [–] Sorry, lads only Astrokiwi 15 points ago * (lasted edited 3 days ago) in CasualUK

    Stick your bum in the air like the downwards-facing-dog yoga move and it'll bubble to the surface, because methane is lighter than arse.

    [–] Which of these is correct: Astrokiwi 3 points ago in EnglishLearning

    Either is correct, but they sound a little poetic. If you want a more technical/prosaic form that's easier to understand, you can just say "The gate is quite safe because it's made of metal", or "The gate's made of metal, it's quite safe".

    Generally we like active simple verbs in English. Other languages can prefer more complex styles. Your one sounds like the Latin "ablative absolute" to me - my Italian officemate would use that a bit often too in his writing.

    [–] Pretty much the world right now. Astrokiwi 1 points ago in funny

    I see him as sort of a retired Gandalf of a previous age.

    [–] That moment when you realize how bad your mom is with babies, and it explains a lot about adult you. Astrokiwi 24 points ago in beyondthebump

    I think part of the issue is that kids spend longer times in older stages of development, and those insane early periods are so quick that you forget about them, especially as the older stages were more recent. I mean, people aren't stupid so it's not like someone's going to treat a 3 month old like a 5 year old, but they might treat a 1 year old like a 3 year old.

    [–] User thinks people that use "on accident" are uneducated Astrokiwi 11 points ago in badlinguistics

    The thing is, these people aren't doing linguistics, they're being language-users. Linguistics is a science, and serves primarily to observe and analyse language, essentially by definition. In that context, of course "correct" and "incorrect" and meaningless. But the perception of correctness - often associated with some prestige dialect - is a fairly common part of language use. Part of the psychology of language is not just the unconscious set of rules for how people speak, but also the set of spoken rules that people use to guide their own speech and that of others. When we tell people not to say that a certain phrase is "incorrect", we are (ironically) being prescriptivists - we are telling them they are using their language incorrectly, because they are being judgemental about something arbitrary. In the context of linguistics you can say this, especially if they say something genuinely falsifiable (e.g. "people who say 'axe' instead of 'ask' are stupid"), but if people are just choosing to be proscriptive and define an arbitrary "correct" dialect, then that's just part of the cultural baggage that comes with language use.

    [–] User thinks people that use "on accident" are uneducated Astrokiwi 18 points ago in badlinguistics

    You can sorta argue it relates to education (although not to intelligence), but only in the sense that schools tend to push a single arbitrary accent that essentially by definition becomes the "educated" accent.