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    [–] (Spoilers Extended) Dany’s most abhorrent evil act that was left out of the show Dpate10 1 points ago in asoiaf

    Yes, I've heard the saying. It usually applies to things that aren't very serious, like having a bad day at work, fighting with a friend or family member, etc. Dany was riding hard every day, to the point of collapse. She was also raped repeatedly every night. She suffered through days of this harsh treatment, but she only felt better after the dragon dream, not on any of the days before.

    That's not strange.

    Dany herself points out that it's strange. I'm sure she's had many bad days in the past, being on the run and all, and suffering through Viserys's abuse. So if she points out that it's strange, it's strange.

    You can make a connection between anything that happens to occur at the same time, doesn't mean it's meaningful or a sign that you should walk into a fire.

    The egg was petrified. It being warm to the touch was not normal. Anyway, I never said Dany's decision makes perfect sense, just that it wasn't done wholly on a whim, as you said.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) Dany’s most abhorrent evil act that was left out of the show Dpate10 2 points ago * (lasted edited 20 hours ago) in asoiaf

    Her demeanor drastically changing from just a night's sleep makes sense? Her new attitude is so apparent that her handmaids notice right away. Before going to sleep that day she decides she'll kill herself (not contemplating, but actually wanting do it), and then all her negative thoughts vanish. No, that's not normal, and certainly not comparable to "eating a big meal before going to sleep."

    Moreover, after the dream, she notices that the biggest egg (Drogon) is warm. She'd be able to make a connection between those two things.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) Dany’s most abhorrent evil act that was left out of the show Dpate10 0 points ago * (lasted edited 20 hours ago) in asoiaf

    In Dany’s case she goes from deciding she’ll kill herself to finding the strength, somehow, to keep going. The decision to end her life was precipitated by days of harsh riding and worse; a night’s sleep doesn’t make that disappear, especially if you’re going to sleep still scared.

    Dany even points out how strange it is.

    Further, this is a series where characters can send dreams, where they can telepathically connect to animals. We know Dany has a connection to Drogon. The day after the dream, Drogon’s egg was warm to the touch. It’s possible she drew strength from it.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) Dany’s most abhorrent evil act that was left out of the show Dpate10 2 points ago in asoiaf

    It’s not lunacy. Her dreams, whatever they really are, seem to have power:

    She could feel her flesh sear and blacken and slough away, could feel her blood boil and turn to steam, and yet there was no pain. She felt strong and new and fierce.

    *And the next day, strangely, she did not seem to hurt quite so much. *

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) Dany’s most abhorrent evil act that was left out of the show Dpate10 1 points ago * (lasted edited 21 hours ago) in asoiaf

    Well, it’s not just a whim in the books since she has dragon dreams beforehand.

    In them the dragon fire sears and blackens her flesh, setting her blood to boiling, yet she feels strong and new and fierce, and that strength carries over when she wakes. That probably somewhat informed her decision to enter the burning pyre.

    [–] What is the worst thing Arya has done ? Dpate10 1 points ago * (lasted edited 5 days ago) in pureasoiaf

    1.) Well, since you implied that she did have authority to kill Dareon, because of her Stark heritage, I thought you were justifying the murder, thinking it wasn’t wrong. But thanks for clarifying.

    2.) I didn’t mean she never feels any emotions afterwards; I meant she was pretty emotionless right after murdering the guard. She doesn’t feel bad, isn’t shocked like Hot Pie, only thinking about the blood being washed away by the rain.

    It’s true, she does wonder what her mother might think, but she doesn’t show regret for the act itself (as far as I can remember). And after her mom and brother die, things only get darker.

    Her murder of Dareon is even worse than that of the guard’s, in my opinion. With the guard you could argue he was a roadblock that needed to be crossed (for them to escape Harrenhal), though it’s still disturbing. Dareon, on the other hand, was not a roadblock, but she still takes it upon herself to kill him.

    3.) If by moral barometer you mean a sick, twisted one, then yes.

    [–] What is the worst thing Arya has done ? Dpate10 2 points ago in pureasoiaf

    1.) Those two circumstances are very different. One was a forced situation where they had to fight, and she was scared. In the other she murders a guard standing watch, and she’s emotionless after the kill. Hot Pie’s reaction shows that a normal person her age would never even think of doing something like that.

    It’s a progression of her arc. Going from being afraid to kill to having no problem doing it.

    2.) Yes, I understand why she killed Dareon, but that doesn’t make it any less disturbing. If Ned were alive to see it, he would be horrified—not thinking, “Good girl. I’m so proud.”

    [–] What is the worst thing Arya has done ? Dpate10 1 points ago * (lasted edited 5 days ago) in pureasoiaf

    It’s a twisted version of Ned’s “the man who passes the sentence should swing the sword.” Arya follows Dareon into a dark alley and then slits his throat, killing him unaware.

    Here’s Ned’s philosophy:

    If you would take a man's life, you owe it to him to look into his eyes and hear his final words. (AGOT - Bran I)

    We’re not supposed to think Arya’s killing of Dareon is a good thing. Her callousness is disturbing, especially for a girl who is 11 years old. Ned would’ve been horrified.

    Compare her reaction to murder to Hot Pie’s, who is of a close age:

    By the time Hot Pie and Gendry came up with the horses, the rain was falling hard. "You killed him!" Hot Pie gasped.

    "What did you think I would do?" Her fingers were sticky with blood, and the smell was making her mare skittish. It's no matter, she thought, swinging up into the saddle. The rain will wash them clean again. (ACOK - Arya X)

    [–] (Spoilers Main) So are we just going forget about.. Dpate10 5 points ago * (lasted edited 6 days ago) in asoiaf

    This particular mystery was reiterated in season six (it was first brought up in season three), when Kinvara, the red priest, mentions it and we see Varys’s terrified expression. Why bring it up again three seasons later if you’re not going to do anything with it?

    [–] [Spoilers Main] A Wheel of Ice and Fire: The Ending of the Books and What Comes Next (Theory). Dpate10 1 points ago * (lasted edited 7 days ago) in asoiaf

    There are three quotes, and said by three different characters. The cyclical nature of humanity is evident in ASOIAF, as shown by many events and moments in the story.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) REACTIONS: Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 5 Post-Episode Reactions Dpate10 7 points ago in asoiaf

    So much action, yet so boring. You get desensitized to it all very quickly—it’s all just crumbling buildings and random people you don’t care about getting burned every other shot. However, I do think there are a handful of good character moments throughout.

    [–] [Spoilers ACOK] Why Stannis became a red faith follower? Dpate10 4 points ago * (lasted edited 8 days ago) in asoiaf

    He's not really a follower, not at first, mostly using the faith for pragmatic reasons. Later, however, he seems to believe in it, after seeing a vision in the flames. And in ADWD, he spends a lot of time in a tower, staring at a burning brazier, and we see physical changes (weight loss, sunken eyes), like and addict. Now that Davos, the angel on his shoulder, is elsewhere, all that's left is the devil, Melisandre, and so, too, the corruption.

    [–] Frustrating realisation Dpate10 1 points ago * (lasted edited 10 days ago) in lost

    The survivors are perfectly happy to mow down innocent DHARMA workers

    While being shot at. They’re protecting themselves, and would’ve never started shooting if they hadn’t been spotted (which is what they were hoping for). The MiB is callous, uncaring and ruthless after having been transformed and being trapped on the Island for several hundred years. Even Ben is given emotional, feel-bad moments after all he’s done, showing regret. You’d be a fool to think the takeaway from the Dharma shootout is that the main characters don’t care about human life. Dramatic TV shows need their action scenes, you know.

    We don't know that.

    MiB is intrinsically connected to the Source, so why wouldn’t he get his powers back once the link was reestablished? Regardless, it wouldn’t be a good thing to have someone with his mental state living amongst others outside the Island, even as a mortal. He’s been corrupted by his malevolence.

    True, but it's still a bit of a stretch that they'd move on with these specific people rather than their own families

    Who’s to say there aren’t deeper levels to this afterlife? Maybe different stages, ones where they get to reunite with their family members as well? This is pure speculation, but Lost is a show that allows viewers to interpret things their own way and create their own theories.

    You also have to look at it from the perspective that it’s a TV show. It would’ve been quite underwhelming if their meetings were with side characters we hardly saw.

    [–] Frustrating realisation Dpate10 2 points ago * (lasted edited 9 days ago) in lost

    But the MiB wasn’t really selfish

    Not at first. But having been turned into a smoke monster, essentially losing his humanity, and being trapped for hundreds of years turned him into a callous being, ruthlessly killing anyone in his path.

    He had to be killed, or else when the cork was put back, he’d have his powers again. And you wouldn’t want someone like him, with a troubling mental state, living amongst humans outside the Island, having regained his powers.

    They spent approximately 2-3 months together [...]

    To be fair, those 2-3 months were not typical. The sheer amount they endured together is more than most endure over many years (even if you exclude all the fantastical/sci-fi elements), so it’s easy to understand why they developed meaningful relationships. They told each other secrets they had never told before. In life, it is true that those who share traumatic experiences can become very close. And, as established, some of them did not have much of anything outside the Island.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) The Lion Knight's Final Scene in Episode 4 was not out of character from the books Dpate10 5 points ago * (lasted edited 12 days ago) in asoiaf

    That's a good point about the Tower of the Hand, but I think there's a big leap between being disquieted and thinking Cersei would be willing to blow up Kingslanding with all its people in it. You might have doubts about someone, so you hold out hope that things will be alright, that you may be mistaken. What breaks the final straw is having all doubt removed.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) The Lion Knight's Final Scene in Episode 4 was not out of character from the books Dpate10 10 points ago * (lasted edited 9 days ago) in asoiaf

    Cersei doesn't love Jaime any more than as a narcissistic extension of herself

    Yes, I agree. The same applies to her children. Tommen’s safety is just a fail-safe for her mind - as long as he’s okay, that means the Maggie the Frog prophecy can’t possibly be true, and no younger and more beautiful queen will cast her down. She hardly spends any time with Tommen, only briefly talking to him during meal times, and then promptly shooing him off to go play with his kittens. With Joffrey, she mostly thought of him in terms of looks, of his resemblance to Jamie and herself.

    He knows who and what Cersei is

    Sure, but to what extent? I don’t think he believes she would go as far as blowing Kingslanding with wildfire. Do you ever fully know someone, when you’re not privy to all their thoughts and secrets and can’t be with them 24/7?

    I don’t know if you’ve read George’s A Song for Lya, but (spoiler) the idea behind Lyanna joining the collective consciousness, where she can be one with all, is that she doesn’t believe humans can ever truly know each other, even telepaths, which she is. Though she can read her lover’s mind and connect with him on a telepathic level, there’s still so much that is hidden and can’t be shared or experienced together. (Jamie and Cersei were as close as can be, connected more so than most, but still, that distance.) You can hug a loved one, but most times you’re apart, regardless of the distance. You can see someone’s external reactions, but you can never know all that they’re thinking.

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) The Lion Knight's Final Scene in Episode 4 was not out of character from the books Dpate10 27 points ago * (lasted edited 12 days ago) in asoiaf

    A large portion of Jamie’s story in the later parts of ASOS and all of AFFC is him essentially falling out of love with Cersei, and realizing that she never truly loved him. Almost all their interactions in ASOS consist of Cersei only seeking him out for favours, and then promptly getting mad when he refuses her. The final breaking point could be him realizing that there is nothing to salvage, when he finds out about Cersei’s wildfire plans, confirming that she is the monster everyone claims her to be, and that he can’t be with her.

    [–] [Spoilers Extended] Their Names Shall Live in Infamy: Ronald Moore, Damon Lindelof, Scott Buck, David Benioff, Daniel Weiss Dpate10 0 points ago * (lasted edited 13 days ago) in asoiaf

    Jack’s father, Christian, says that everything that happened on the Island was real. It’s essentially spelled out for the audience that they weren’t dead the whole time.

    And no, the ending of Lost is not objectively terrible.

    [–] [Spoilers Extended] Their Names Shall Live in Infamy: Ronald Moore, Damon Lindelof, Scott Buck, David Benioff, Daniel Weiss Dpate10 -2 points ago * (lasted edited 13 days ago) in asoiaf

    Martin misinterpreted the ending of Lost, thinking the characters were dead the whole time.

    Quote:

    Having been a veteran of not only writing for but watching Twilight Zone [Martin wrote for a CBS remake in the 1980s] it was about the second episode of Lost, I said, "Oh, they're all dead." They're all dead. That's what it would be in a half-hour Rod Sterling Twilight Zone, in 1958.

    [–] (Spoilers Main) Dany becoming a “Mad Queen” is lazy writing. Dpate10 24 points ago * (lasted edited 13 days ago) in asoiaf

    I think Dany will have a “mad” moment in the books, but will then revert back after realizing what’s she’s done. Cersei is the one who’s been built up as going full mad queen; her character is that of a power hungry and paranoid individual who cares little about anyone (even Jaime, who she “loves” because of his resemblance to her), and there is that moment in AFFC where she admires the wildfire burning the Tower of the Hand, mesmerized by the beauty of the green flames.

    Cersei doesn’t even love her children in the books. Tommen’s safety is just a fail-safe for her mind; as long as he’s okay, that means the Maggie the Frog prophecy can’t possibly be true, and no younger and more beautiful queen will cast her down. She hardly spends any time with Tommen, only briefly talking to him during meal times, and then promptly shooing him off to go play with his kittens. With Joffrey, she mostly thought of him in terms of looks, of his resemblance to Jamie and herself.

    [–] [Spoilers Extended] Why it should have been Theon Dpate10 1 points ago * (lasted edited 16 days ago) in asoiaf

    It would've been nice if, while dying, Theon asked Arya to move him closer to the Heart tree (the symbol of what he chose to fight for: the North, the Starks--his family) so he could look upon the leaves as he died

    [–] (Spoilers Extended) Stop Comparing The Scourging of the Shire And The Next Upcoming Conflict Dpate10 3 points ago * (lasted edited 14 days ago) in asoiaf

    Scouring of the Shire is the heroes coming back home only to find that war has touched it as well. The equivalent of "home" in the show would be Winterfell, the place that holds the most emotional significance, and war has already touched it (in fact, it's one of the only places the dead have touched, since the White Walkers didn't even get past the northern kingdoms). The Scouring in the books will most likely have to do with whatever aftermath the Others and Euron have left in their wake.

    [–] Unresolved storylines Dpate10 4 points ago * (lasted edited 14 days ago) in lost

    The horse was an Island-projection. The Island had a way of allowing characters to confront their past, making them stronger, like the cocoon does the moth.

    You see this little hole? This moth's just about to emerge. It's in there right now, struggling. It's digging its way through the thick hide of the cocoon. Now, I could help it -- take my knife, gently widen the opening, and the moth would be free -- but it would be too weak to survive. Struggle is nature's way of strengthening it. Now this is the second time you've asked me for your drugs back... ask me again, and it's yours.

    The cocoon can be thought of as the Island, and the moth can be thought of as the characters. Each one was lost when they arrived on the Island, but through the trials and tribulations set on them by the Island/on the Island, they were able to come out stronger than they were before. Struggle is nature's way of strengthening us. Without the Island, none of them would have been able to accept their past and move on. It's like Damon Lindelof said, "If the characters can forgive themselves, then the show's over. The show's called Lost -- it's not because they're on an island, it's because they're lost."

    In “What Kate Did” Kate deals with having murdered her father (Wayne).

    From the episode (Kate talking to Jack):

    I'm sorry I'm not as perfect as you. I'm sorry that I'm not as good!

    From Lostpedia:

    When Kate returns to the Swan, she asks Sawyer if he can hear her, first saying "Sawyer?" then "Wayne?" Sawyer stirs and mumbles inaudibly. Kate, believing that Wayne's ghost has possessed Sawyer's body, confesses aloud that she killed him after finding out he was her biological father.

    Following Kate's confession, Sawyer awakes as his normal self, and his comments reveal he has heard the whole conversation. Kate is embarrassed but relieved.

    Kate is relieved because she was able to come to terms with what she did to Wayne. By talking to ‘him’ and confessing, she was able to free herself from her troubled past and move on. This is represented by the black horse, the same one that appeared in the flashback. It represents freedom. If it weren’t for that horse, she wouldn’t have been able to escape the U.S. Marshal. And after she confesses, she sees it again, showing that she’s free from her past and has forgiven herself.

    [–] Well that was quick Dpate10 1 points ago in marvelstudios

    What about the Wikipedia list that has Avatar as #2? It’s worldwide totals adjusted for inflation.