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    Goal1

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    [–] Here is my words of wisdom after reading Peter Lynch’s, One Upon Wall Street a couple-times. Goal1 1 points ago in investing

    I mean 50% would put us at 2011 levels. I don’t think that’s going to happen. Can we both agree that the recent market levels have been overextended or do you feel differently brother?

    [–] Here is my words of wisdom after reading Peter Lynch’s, One Upon Wall Street a couple-times. Goal1 1 points ago in investing

    I don’t have any stocks right now. All cash. I have been looking around and I plan to buy AtlasBX with my interactive brokers account. As for the domestic market, the market is obviously overvalued and I’m still reading up to come to my conclusions. Retail is sketchy right now but I’m looking at Big Lots $BIG and I’m also looking at a chicken farmer by the name of Bachoco $IBA

    [–] Here is my words of wisdom after reading Peter Lynch’s, One Upon Wall Street a couple-times. Goal1 2 points ago * (lasted edited 7 hours ago) in investing

    In the short term the market tends to be irrational and places companies much under or over their fundamentally appropriate price. Over time mean reversion acts as a mediator among the stock markets and pushes companies down from their highs and pushes low compmakes up to their average. The point of value investing is to find these companies trading below their actual value. The companies with the largest margin of safety. This is when the market has misplaced them in reference of their fundamental values which say they should be at a higher price.

    Even growth or GARP investing has its ‘rules’ too. A lot of famous growth investors such as Mark Zweigwould highly suggest finding growth companies at PE ratios under 35. Just because FANG has dominated the SP500 doesn’t mean that fundamentally the market isn’t just driven by hype. In the Acquirers Multiple, they bring up good arguments and studies made by behavior economists showing that people tend to overextend the price rises and price drops of the stock market. Their research shows by finding companies at the bottom with the largest margin of safety ( dull, mundane out of style ) companies , you make more money in the long run.

    By buying FANG and other companies above their margin of safety you are taking a risk of buying a company that’s above its actual fundamental value. Is price/x tells me that it shouldn’t be so high. If valuation models like DCF, PS Median, tangible power, earnings power tell me its too high. If Piotroski scores are falling, if my Altman z score or beneish m valuation metrics are telling me the price shouldn’t be so high, then I’m not buying.

    In stocks and investing in general, you need to find what works for you and you need to stick to your fundamentals and ideologies. Obviously FANG has made people a lot of money. I just need a better answer than “everyone’s buying it” as the reason you would buy that company. Zig when others zag is a key point I’ve learned in my investing career so far. Money is their to be made. The stock market is a pasture. Are you gonna eat from the same patch of grass as everyone else? It’s bound to die out from all the eating and walking around? Or are you going to be a mile out enjoying all the grass you can eat, the grass people didn’t want just because it’s a bit dry rn?

    [–] Here is my words of wisdom after reading Peter Lynch’s, One Upon Wall Street a couple-times. Goal1 2 points ago in investing

    You’re right margin of safety wasn’t covered in the chapters I wrote about. Margin of safety is super important and is perfectly correctly with mean reversion. One of the most fascinating concepts in economics in my opinion. To piggyback on what you said Marin of safety is a fundamental valuation based in the form of a percentage. The bigger the % the higher chance you have of making money with the lowest amount of risk involved. Greenblatt suggests a margin of safety of 20% or greater as excellent

    [–] Here is my words of wisdom after reading Peter Lynch’s, One Upon Wall Street a couple-times. Goal1 17 points ago in investing

    Then do it, it’s a solid idea. I suggest reading up on Jack Bogle. Lots of good books on mutual funds and ETFs. Common sense on Mutual Funds is my personal favorite of his. Cheers

    [–] Here is my words of wisdom from Peter Lynch’s first part of his book, One Up on Wall Street Goal1 1 points ago in stocks

    Pump and dumps are illegal and if caught it’s big fines from the SEC. I would argue low Institutional ownership as pump and dumps are done more so on companies with higher bid-ask spreads and lower trade volume. They initiate large artificial volumes to manipulate sell offs. Institutional usually have rules in regards to what stocks they can buy or actions they can initiate

    [–] Here is my words of wisdom from Peter Lynch’s first part of his book, One Up on Wall Street Goal1 1 points ago in stocks

    Tobias Carlisle makes good points about zigging with others zag. You get ahead when you move the opposite way of the crowd. It seems counterproductive but the opportunities are there. Mean reversion is also another economic concept that’s important to cover. Through it you can find opportunities when zigging while everyone else zags. Also by picking stocks that have low Institutional ownership shows that you’re in the right place in terms of being as far away as possible from the crowd

    [–] Subs that expose people through text/dm are toxic communities, full of circlejerking and I can’t stand it one bit. Goal1 10 points ago * (lasted edited 5 days ago) in unpopularopinion

    You’re just mad because you got down voted on my /r/niceguys post bro. Stop being an incel and you’ll have nothing to worry about

    [–] hmmm Goal1 1 points ago in hmmm

    I removed old post because I had the license plate included