Please help contribute to the Reddit categorization project here

    LizMcIntyre

    + friends - friends
    104,661 link karma
    13,986 comment karma
    send message redditor for

    [–] Is There Any Way to Protect Your Information Online? (Fashion, a print and online fashion magazine, recommends Startpage.com & DuckDuckGo) LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacy

    Yeah it is POLA. One of the bigger Japanese fashion magazines out of Tokyo.

    Actually, it's a print and online Canadian-based fashion magazine available at fashionmagazine.com. I'm not seeing any Japanese connection, but maybe I'm missing something.

    Regardless, it's great news that a fashion magazine is devoting copy to privacy. It suggests to me that privacy is going mainstream.

    [–] Whats the surprise here? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacytoolsIO

    Yes, using Google Maps is a bad idea for privacy. I'm not the OP, and I deny Google anything I possibly can, but I've been out of town and lost. I admit that I've gone to maps in desperation.

    I've found that "deny, deny, deny" is a good strategy. Then I add back only what is essential. I revoke any permissions unless I desperately need an app.

    [–] What about a Privacy friendly two step authentication app? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacytoolsIO

    I've been looking into Myki. It works like a cloud-based password manager, but it works on device. It also has a 2FA feature. Has anyone tried this?

    [–] Best Privacy/Freedom Respecting Linux/BSD Distro for ease of use? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacytoolsIO

    ease of use

    I find using a GNU/Linux distro SO much easier than dealing with Windows. Microsoft makes using its products a nightmare, not to mention the serious privacy issues associated with the company's data siphoning products.

    [–] Best Privacy/Freedom Respecting Linux/BSD Distro for ease of use? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago * (lasted edited 2 days ago) in privacytoolsIO

    That does sound strange. I’m using StartPage exclusively in FF on manjaro and have never had that (or any related) issue

    Are you using Manjaro in a VM? Maybe that's the issue in my case. Things work a little differently in a VM. I loved everything else about Manjaro and would love to use it as one of my go-to options.

    It could also be the fault of my older machine. I'll try Manjaro again on my custom machine to see if it makes a difference since you have had luck with using Startpage.com with Manjaro.

    [–] Here are all the countries where the government is trying to ban VPNs - ProtonVPN Blog LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in ProtonVPN

    I've had more issues with Tor than with a VPN. When I use Tor, I get captchas frequently.

    Of course, a VPN doesn't protect against fingerprinting like Tor does, so other precautions are required. Masking your IP is great, but you can still be tracked unless you use other layers of protection, like a proxy.

    [–] Here are all the countries where the government is trying to ban VPNs - ProtonVPN Blog LizMcIntyre 2 points ago in ProtonVPN

    If you ever get a captcha when using a VPN, try refreshing the IP. If the IP address you are using is associated with past abuse, it will trigger the captcha.

    [–] Where do you personally draw the line between convenience and privacy? LizMcIntyre 4 points ago in privacy

    I don't think that I have exact line. I'm always looking alternatives systems to replace big data hoarding ones.

    I agree u/LocalFigurez. I'm no Luddite, either. In fact, I LOVE technology.

    That said, there are simple things anyone can do to protect privacy. Just switching search engines is one of those changes that costs nothing, but makes a big difference since what people search for tells so much about who they are, their medical conditions, political leanings etc. Why give up that kind of personal information to Google, Yahoo or Bing?

    Startpage.com and DuckDuckGo are two to consider because they offer popular results in privacy:

    • Startpage.com = mainly Google search results in privacy

    • DuckDuckGo = mainly Yahoo /Bing search results in privacy

    Note: See my bio. I consult w/ SP, but I also believe in DDG as a better alternative, too.

    [–] Argh! I fucking hate Microsoft, and Windows 10! This piece of cancer made me lose my work! LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in rant

    ...I was in my 'Startpage' [search engine, Fuck Google too]

    For those who don't know, Startpage.com is like the old Scroogle, but with better features. Google doesn't see you and SP doesn't collect any user personal information.

    [–] Argh! I fucking hate Microsoft, and Windows 10! This piece of cancer made me lose my work! LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in rant

    Not ridiculous at all! GNU/Linux distros are great. So much better than when I first tried them many years ago. What's more, the available free software is on par with Office etc.

    For newbies switching from WIndows I recommend a Windows-like distro that works out of the box on many computers: Linux Mint. Mint even has a pared down version that will work on older computers with less available memory.

    It's best to try out a distro by creating a bootable USB and checking out whether everything works before installing it, like the Internet connection, mic etc. If one distro doesn't work, there are many others to try.

    [–] Is there some sort of 'anonymous Google search' app for Android? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacy

    Using the !g to bang into Google from DDG is like going directly to Google! This defeats the purpose of private search.

    Use the !s or !sp to bang into Startpage for Google search results in privacy.

    DuckDuckGo serves mainly Yahoo search results so why go directly to Yahoo with the !y? Again that is like going directly to Yahoo and defeats private search.

    [–] Europe’s privacy laws are now so tough, they are taking names off doorbells in Vienna ("But some critics say that the push toward more privacy has gone too far.") LizMcIntyre 2 points ago in privacy

    Right. My first instinct was to look at who owns WAPO. Of course, it's Jeff Bezos of Amazon. EU privacy laws negatively impact Jeff's businesses, something the article never mentions. (It only mentions competitors.) He's likely also worried that the U.S. will pass its own more stringent privacy laws.

    It's interesting that the article focuses on a more extreme situation in one country as a way to introduce the argument that privacy has gone too far in Europe.

    [–] Europe’s privacy laws are now so tough, they are taking names off doorbells in Vienna ("But some critics say that the push toward more privacy has gone too far.") LizMcIntyre 0 points ago * (lasted edited 2 days ago) in privacy

    Rick Noack writes at the Washington Post:

    Finding someone’s home in Vienna used to be a fairly simple process. You approached the building, checked for the correct name from the list at the door and then rang the doorbell.

    But these are difficult times, and doorbells aren’t an exception.

    Across the Austrian capital, last names are being replaced with numbers to conform with a new far-reaching European privacy law that took effect earlier this year. About 220,000 name tags will be removed in Vienna by the end of the year, the city’s housing authority said. Officials fear that they could otherwise be fined up to $23 million, or about $1,150 per name.

    ...

    The continent has long been at the forefront of consumer protection laws. While Google Street View blurred the faces of individuals across the world, European users successfully demanded an additional option to have their houses or apartments blurred, too. E.U. watchdogs also regularly investigate American tech giants like Google and Facebook and have shown a more serious commitment to hold them to account over privacy breaches than their U.S. counterparts.

    But some critics say that the push toward more privacy has gone too far. Several U.S. news sites — including the Chicago Tribune and the Los Angeles Times — became inaccessible in Europe after the new data-protection law was introduced earlier this year, making it illegal for those papers to harvest data from their readers and resell it. Those companies did not want to risk E.U. fines (or give up on data harvesting) and instead now block European readers.

    ...

    So has privacy gone too far in Europe as is suggested in the WAPO article?

    [–] Best Privacy/Freedom Respecting Linux/BSD Distro for ease of use? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacytoolsIO

    I had an odd experience with Manjaro in a VM. It worked, but when I used Startpage.com search, the search box went black after the first search. That search engine is a must for me so I got rid of that VM. (Maybe I'm missing something?)

    I do use Trisquel, but the window sizing is a pain. I hear the defaults are used to help prevent fingerprinting, but they prevent me from enjoying a full screen. Would love to find a solution to that.

    PureOS. James at Purism encouraged me to try this so I did. I had search engine issues with that, too, so that's gone.

    Haven't tried Parabola yet, but I plan to test it in a VM. Anyone have experience with that?

    BTW - What do you think about referring to "Linux" distros as "GNU/Linux" at least in a first reference to honor the work of Richard Stallman? Without GNU, there'd be no "Linux" distros -- rms set me straight on that point. He writes about this here.

    [–] Internet provider groups sue Vermont over net neutrality law (Vermont Governor Phil Scott vows to fight for "free and open access to information on the internet") LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in KeepOurNetFree

    David Shepardon reports at Reuters that ISP groups are suing Vermont over its state net neutrality protections:

    ...

    The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Vermont by groups representing major providers like AT&T Inc, Comcast Corp and Verizon Communications Inc. It followed a lawsuit by four of the groups earlier this month challenging a much broader California law mandating providers abide by net neutrality rules.

    The trade associations are also challenging an executive order on the issue signed by Vermont Governor Phil Scott. Other states, including New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Montana and Hawaii, have adopted similar rules to bar state contracts from companies not complying with net neutrality protections.

    Scott, a Republican governor, is standing strong and vowing to fight for citizens:

    Scott said he was disappointed the lawsuit was filed against the state "for taking action to protect our citizens and our economy." The Republican governor said he believed Vermont residents "have a right to free and open access to information on the internet. In the absence of a national standard to protect that right, states must act."

    ...

    [–] ISPs Sue Vermont Over Net Neutrality Moves (But Governor Scott is standing strong. He vows to fight!) LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in MarchForNetNeutrality

    John Eggerton reports at Multichannel News:

    Cable and telecom ISPs have teamed up to sue Vermont over two interrelated attempts to regulate internet access and restore rules rolled back by the FCC's Open Internet Order.

    The American Cable Association, NCTA-The Internet & Television Association, USTelecom and CTIA filed suit Thursday in a federal district court in Vermont against a law and executive order they argue are preempted by the FCC's order and therefore unconstitutional.

    Vermont Governor Phil Scott has vowed to fight the ISPs in a statement he released earlier:

    ... “Our net neutrality legislation and my Executive Order demonstrate a clear commitment from Vermont’s elected officials, across branches and party lines, to preserving and promoting a free and open internet in Vermont.

    “I am disappointed to hear national telecom and cable organizations plan to sue us for taking action to protect our citizens and our economy.

    "While I understand consistent regulation is important to ensuring a vibrant and thriving telecom and cable sector, our obligation as a state government is to our citizens, who I strongly believe have a right to free and open access to information on the internet. In the absence of a national standard to protect that right, states must act."

    “I am committed to working with the Attorney General’s Office to stand up for these rights in court.”

    [–] How many people use DuckDuckGo? LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in SEO

    You can get Google search results in privacy with Startpage.com. It's like the old Scroogle, but with upgrades. DDG delivers mainly Yahoo /Bing results, and is definitely better than going directly to Yahoo. Good to have options!

    [–] Tragic Thursday LizMcIntyre 4 points ago in belgium

    You can "fight fire with fire" by using Startpage.com because it delivers mainly Google search results in privacy. It's like the old Scroogle.

    DuckDuckGo is also good and delivers mainly Yahoo search results in privacy, so it's a good way to fight back against Yahoo and its owner Verizon (the ISP that fights net neutrality.)

    [–] Is There Any Way to Protect Your Information Online? (Fashion, a print and online fashion magazine, recommends Startpage.com & DuckDuckGo) LizMcIntyre 4 points ago in privacy

    Here's a really positive indicator that privacy is going mainstream. Fashion, a print and online magazine, is featuring an article on protecting your information online.

    Journalist Guy Saddy writes in his piece titled Everything You Need to Know About Privacy Settings and How to Protect Yourself:

    Even though I’m hardly a power user, the information held in trust by the social media giant [Facebook] is frighteningly complete: every post I’ve made, every comment I’ve dashed off, every thumbs-up I’ve given, every advertiser I’ve clicked on (and a bunch that I never even knew existed). At some point, I have allowed access to my personal address book, unwittingly giving up information on everyone from Lululemon founder Chip Wilson to 1980s heartthrob/crooner Gino Vannelli.

    It’s not just Facebook, of course. From the search engines you use to the apps on your phone to your Internet service provider (ISP), your life online is subject to innumerable privacy breaches.

    ...

    The author discusses several privacy pitfalls, but wisely points out the importance of search privacy, saying:

    You can try an alternative search engine like Startpage.com or DuckDuckGo; neither one claims to keep track of your travels or searches, and both can be accessed through their respective websites or easily added to your browsers, desktop or mobile devices....

    They’re not perfect—in terms of quantity, you’ll likely find more comprehensive results using Google—but for most general surfing applications, they’ll do what you need them to do.

    ...

    Regulars at r/privacy often lament the lack of concern many people have about privacy. Is it possible concern is growing and this article is a hint of more concern to come? I hope so.