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    LizMcIntyre

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    [–] Your privacy choices (and personal info sites glean) could affect how much you pay for things online LizMcIntyre 5 points ago in europrivacy

    Companies like Amazon were caught doing "differential pricing" years ago and forced to apologize. Looks like this practice is back again and going strong.

    This is an excellent example to share with friends and family who claim they don't care about privacy because they have nothing to hide. They do--even if it's just about protecting information that retailers can use to manipulate pricing. Privacy is also a "wallet issue."

    [–] Looking for bargains online? Who you are can affect what you pay - Business LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in conspiracy

    Companies like Amazon were caught doing "differential pricing" years ago and forced to apologize. Looks like this practice is back again and going strong.

    This is an excellent example to share with friends and family who claim they don't care about privacy because they have nothing to hide. They do--even if it's just about protecting information that retailers can use to manipulate pricing. Privacy is also a "wallet issue."

    [–] The FCC is about to kill net neutrality. We’re protesting nationwide on Dec 7th to stop them. LizMcIntyre 2 points ago in privacy

    Another good way to protest is to boycott Yahoo, Verizon's latest purchase. We should be using private search engines, regardless, but if you need Yahoo search results, use DuckDuckGo instead. They deliver Yahoo search results in privacy.

    (Of course, also use StartPage.com for Google search results in privacy!)

    [–] Your privacy choices (and personal info sites glean) could affect how much you pay for things online LizMcIntyre 15 points ago in privacy

    Companies like Amazon were caught doing "differential pricing" years ago and forced to apologize. Looks like this practice is back again and going strong.

    This is an excellent example to share with friends and family who claim they don't care about privacy because they have nothing to hide. They do--even if it's just about protecting information that retailers can use to manipulate pricing. Privacy is also a "wallet issue."

    [–] Morgue assistant posting autopsy pics on social media begs question: Do we have privacy rights after death? LizMcIntyre 3 points ago in privacy

    She has corpse body parts all around her home, too, according to the news story. I'm wondering how she can legally take these parts and make them hers. What about ownership of body parts after death? (Makes one think about the Henrietta Lacks case.)

    On top of that, I'm wondering about the legality of removing human parts from a facility due to public health concerns. I know hospitals where I live won't allow a surgery patient to even take home a piece of bone removed during surgery. You can get pics, but no human tissue--even if it's from your own body.

    [–] A free burner phone service for receiving sms and calls LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacy

    Could you give a brief overview of how this works and what it takes to implement?

    [–] Incognito mode doesn't protect your privacy and can let your boss see what you're browsing LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacy

    A VPN won't help if the boss has installed a keylogger. It also won't save you if you are fingerprinted and sign into accounts as yourself/tracked via cookies/objects.

    [–] Incognito mode doesn't protect your privacy and can let your boss see what you're browsing LizMcIntyre 1 points ago in privacytoolsIO

    Then they should call it Chrome "local privacy" mode and brag that it may prevent someone with physical access to your computer from easily finding your online activities. Then add "even so, this is no guarantee of protection from local attack vectors, like keyloggers."

    [–] Incognito mode doesn't protect your privacy and can let your boss see what you're browsing LizMcIntyre -2 points ago in europrivacy

    The Chrome term "incognito" is misleading. According to Webster's, "incognito" means "with one's identity concealed."

    Even the disclaimer upon opening a new "incognito" tab could be misleading with the "might not" language. "Might not" suggests if you're careful or follow directions, you're safe.

    There are many people who think they're safe using browser and search engine "bangs," too, thinking that since they bang from a more private service they're golden.

    Better to say it again and again rather than create a pool of sitting ducks who are fair game for the surveillance economy hunters.

    [–] Incognito mode doesn't protect your privacy and can let your boss see what you're browsing LizMcIntyre -1 points ago * (lasted edited 4 days ago) in privacytoolsIO

    The Chrome term "incognito" is misleading. According to Webster's, "incognito" means "with one's identity concealed." Chrome needs to change the terminology.

    Even the disclaimer upon opening a new "incognito" tab could be misleading with the "might not" language. "Might not" suggests being identified somehow is a rarity.

    Check out this explanation by Ask Leo, then tell me if you think everyone knows what Chrome "incognito" offers. Here's an excerpt:

    The bottom line is that Incognito (or Private or InPrivate) mode is great at preventing anyone with access to your computer from easily finding your activities there — but it does nothing to protect your online privacy.

    Better to say it again and again rather than create a pool of sitting ducks who are fair game for the surveillance economy hunters.

    [–] Incognito mode doesn't protect your privacy and can let your boss see what you're browsing LizMcIntyre 1 points ago * (lasted edited 4 days ago) in privacy

    The Chrome term "incognito" is misleading. According to Webster's, "incognito" means "with one's identity concealed." Chrome needs to change the terminology.

    Even the disclaimer upon opening a new "incognito" tab could be misleading with the "might not" language. "Might not" suggests being identified somehow is a rarity.

    Check out this explanation by Ask Leo, then tell me if you think everyone knows what Chrome "incognito" offers. Here's an excerpt:

    The bottom line is that Incognito (or Private or InPrivate) mode is great at preventing anyone with access to your computer from easily finding your activities there — but it does nothing to protect your online privacy.

    Better to say it again and again rather than create a pool of sitting ducks who are fair game for the surveillance economy hunters.