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    RHalconero

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    [–] What are some ways a teenager can make money through a job without a citizenship or permanent residence? RHalconero 1 points ago in Calgary

    Depends on his study permit. If it’s a post-secondary one they generally double as a work permit, but he’ll need to check it for specific conditions (on-campus or co-op only, 20 hour per week limit, etc).

    [–] Unpacking Canada's Equalization Payments for 2018-19 RHalconero 3 points ago in alberta

    1) It’s true to the point of being Economics 101.

    2) He cut taxes initially, then had to raise them. Also, the lost revenue I’m referring to is the Deadweight Loss from the Marginal Cost of Public Funds, not what’s taken in by government, otherwise I would call it government revenue.

    [–] The PQ has a problem: Everyone’s leaving the party RHalconero 17 points ago in CanadaPolitics

    Weirdly enough, this is why Albertan conservatives frequently ally with nationalist/autonomist Quebec politicians more often than people realize. Not that Albertan alienation/autonomy/open federalism is nearly on the same level as Quebec nationalism, but some of the same tendencies of suspicion towards Ottawa can make them periodic bedfellows.

    My old MP, Tom Kmiec, once told me some of his best friends in parliament were the BQ folks.

    [–] Unpacking Canada's Equalization Payments for 2018-19 RHalconero 5 points ago * (lasted edited 5 days ago) in alberta

    Even Reaganomics theory is sound, not in the trickle down sense, just that there’s such a thing as an optimal tax rate. The problem was that they applied the theory to an already low tax base, and the increased economic activity didn’t offset the reduced revenue.

    Basically, I agree with you. Just throwing my thoughts in there. :)

    Edit: For people downvoting, I'm not saying I believe in trickle-down or that we need to cut taxes. What I'm saying is that when you raise taxes, there is some deadweight loss. When you lower taxes, you stimulate economic activity. As they relate to revenues, if the goal is to raise them, then you need to consider whether the revenue from that increased economic activity will cover the cuts you made to taxes. That's the theory behind Reaganomics.

    The problem with Reaganomics is that they believed taxes were so high that they would increase revenues by cutting them and reaping the benefits from the increased activity. In reality, most U.S. taxes were on the left side of the Laffer Curve, meaning that increased activity did not offset the cuts, and all that happened was that they lost revenue.

    In Alberta's case, we're on the left side of the Laffer Curve as well, meaning that while a tax cut would likely generate more economic activity, the resulting revenue from that increased activity would not cover the lost revenues from the cut. That doesn't mean the Laffer Curve which underlies Reaganomics is unsound, it means you better make sure you know which side you're on before you go raising or lowering taxes.

    [–] Unpacking Canada's Equalization Payments for 2018-19 RHalconero 26 points ago * (lasted edited 4 days ago) in alberta

    The theory is called the Laffer Curve. Basically that there’s an optimal tax rate. Above it and you reduce revenues by stifling economic activity associated with them. Lower taxes and you’ll raise revenues to a higher level. Or you could be fine with the same level of revenues, but raise economic activity by reducing taxes.

    Below that rate and you’ll just reduce revenues. You might get more economic activity, but not enough to offset the reduction in tax rate.

    The theory is sound, but both sides make mistakes when interpreting it. Here’s some of the most common ones:

    1) Applying the Laffer curve to the entire tax mix: You should only apply it to individual taxes, as these taxes affect markets different ways. Your personal income tax might be set just fine, while excise taxes might be too high.

    2) Lowering taxes will always raise revenues by increasing economic activity: This won’t happen if you’re on the left side of the curve. Also, the curve’s focus isn’t economic activity. It’s about having optimal tax rates.

    3) Alberta being on the right side of the curve: No, we’re not. You can argue that lower taxes give us an advantage, and you’d be right. That said, raising the rates of some taxes by a modest amount is unlikely to stifle that advantage to the extent that we reduce revenues. The only jurisdictions which are estimated to be over the curve in some of their taxes are located in the Atlantic provinces and Quebec.

    That says nothing of what the tax mix should be. I’m in favour of a tax shift rather than a tax raise or tax cut. Cut the CIT, small business tax, and maaaaaybe the PIT, and replace it with an equivalent VAT (with equity considerations like exempted goods + low income rebates). Tax incidence and marginal public cost research shows we could probably do this and introduce a more stable revenue stream (consumption doesn’t fluctuate as much as incomes or company revenue), while also reducing market volatility impacts on workers and companies.

    That’s me just rambling though.

    [–] Wage freezes on the table as city begins negotiations with majority of unions on expired deals RHalconero 1 points ago in Calgary

    It’s functionally the same thing. Purchasing power is equivalent to your income. If the former decreases due to inflation, it’s the equivalent of a decrease to your income even if the wage rate stays the same.

    This is Econ 101 stuff, and one of the first things they’ll tell you is how governments like a reasonable amount of inflation to make debt and wages cheaper.

    [–] Wage freezes on the table as city begins negotiations with majority of unions on expired deals RHalconero 1 points ago in Calgary

    That can be accomplished through inflation, amigo. If your wage increase is lower or non-existent, and inflation remains between 1.5-2.5% then you are making less in real value than you were before.

    Governments also like it because it makes their debt cheaper, and companies are less likely to lay people off if they can hold wages steady.

    [–] Stephen Mandel, Janson Kenney and the Messiah Strategy Alberta conservatives are confident will save their bacon RHalconero 1 points ago in alberta

    I mean, you can believe I’m lying all you want. All I’m saying is I helped organize the energy townhall with Markham Hislop a few months ago, and half the time was spent with Greg texting his wife about getting home to take care of the kids.

    Between that and the makeup of the board at the time Greg stepped down + the board makeup now, the PC takeover narrative lies primarily on one CBC article with anonymous sources and a comment by Brian Mason.

    [–] Stephen Mandel, Janson Kenney and the Messiah Strategy Alberta conservatives are confident will save their bacon RHalconero 1 points ago in alberta

    Nope. I’m not ready to get into his private business, but knowing him personally, his explanation about his kids is the correct one.

    [–] Stephen Mandel, Janson Kenney and the Messiah Strategy Alberta conservatives are confident will save their bacon RHalconero 2 points ago in alberta

    That would be an apt description.

    I would say the 1st and the 3rd have largely gone over to the UCP. I'm sure there are some progressives coming to the Alberta Party are interested in having a say and running under the banner, but 1) if it was all about power there's an easier option and 2) the party has enough OG members and Alberta Liberals that co-operation rather than takeover is the better option.

    I know there's a narrative of Greg getting pushed out, but the guy was telling the truth when he spoke about his kids. His wife is an MD, and between the two of them they were juggling raising small kids all the time.

    [–] Alberta party facing wildrose/UCP style layoffs RHalconero 1 points ago in alberta

    Wut? If you’re referring to what I think you are, that person got a dope job as a chief of staff outside the Legislature. They’re transitioning, yah punce.

    [–] The reaction to Ontario’s minimum wage hike demonizes low-wage earners RHalconero 1 points ago in canada

    Depends on the market. I’m not familiar with Ontario’s so take what I say with a grain of salt. Out of the options could:

    • Do just a minimum wage increase in isolation

    • Do just a WITB increase in isolation

    • Do an increase in both

    I’d offer that the 2nd two are better depending on the market. If it’s a competitive hiring market, doing a WITB increase alone should be enough to accomplish the goal of raising low-income wages without causing any negative kinks or externalities in the labour demand.

    If is a monoscopy situation where firms have significant hiring power, I agree that doing both a WITB and MW increase as better, as the latter ensures that the incidence of the former falls on workers instead of subsidizing low wages.

    Philosophically, I think we need to shift the concept of providing living wages away from the employer-employee relationship to an individual-employer-society relationship, wherein all three have a role in supplying a living income for the individual.

    [–] The reaction to Ontario’s minimum wage hike demonizes low-wage earners RHalconero 11 points ago in canada

    Working income tax benefit increase? I think it’s a good alternative we don’t talk about enough.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 1 points ago in neoliberal

    Real talk: neoliberalism is a broad theory which advocates for free trade, free movement, and global integration, while also recognizing the role of government in addressing market failures like pollution, redistributing wealth to those in need, and areas like healthcare.

    You’ll find differences of opinion in the community, but there is actually a lot of great discussion here on economics, healthcare, foreign policy, etc.

    [–] How Syrian refugees are helping shape Canadian cuisine RHalconero 5 points ago in neoliberal

    From a related NYT article:

    “The meat is halal, but beer is served, and a sticker supporting gay, lesbian and transgender causes is displayed on the front door.” Syrian cuisine is taking over Toronto, writes David Sax.

    2015-16: Canada invites in Syrian refugees.

    2017: Toronto experiences Syrian food boom.

    You can’t explain that, folks.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 0 points ago in neoliberal

    Nope. It was only in 1940 that the United States began even registering resident aliens. Most immigration law prior to that focused on naturalization, with some exceptions. Post-revolutionary United States didn’t regulate it that much.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 1 points ago in neoliberal

    National Archives in a letter to Francis Van der Kemp in 1788.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 1 points ago in neoliberal

    I posted the original letter.

    In that same letter he expresses hope that America can be a place where people of modest means (modest actually meaning “limited” in the language of the day) and good character could come and be prosperous, whatever their nation of origin.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 0 points ago in neoliberal

    Mfw you ignore the well-regulated part of the 2nd amendments.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 3 points ago in neoliberal

    Not quite. While Washington was significantly flawed on issues of slavery and naturalization, immigration in the form of residency remained quite open and liberal.

    [–] George Washington’s view on shithole countries. RHalconero 30 points ago in neoliberal

    We need more spam exports. Lower the shitpost tariffs.