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    delugetheory

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    [–] Why is it that the left seems to form their intellectual tribes in academia and the right seems to form them in think tanks? delugetheory 5 points ago in moderatepolitics

    I just read a great book that answers this question: The Once and Future Liberal by Mark Lilla. It's not just a book for liberals -- it talks just as much about the evolution of the conservative moment in the late 20th and early 21st centuries and, while the author is admittedly liberal, I think the book is fair to (and highly critical of) both sides. Check it out -- it's a very quick read.

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, *1972-2016* [OC] delugetheory 4 points ago in Map_Porn

    I applied the algorithm uniformly across all elections. I guess the way I see it, Perot, and other third party candidates for that matter, shouldn't be removed from the equation... they are part of the equation. Some say Perot and other third-party candidates "steal" votes from the Democratic and Republican candidates, but to me that seems a little two-party-chauvinistic. Perot earned his votes as much as Bush or Clinton, whatever you may think about the usefulness or futility of voting for a third party.

    So in this admittedly simplified algorithm that I've employed, the votes that Perot "took" also represent "popularity" that he took, and Bush and Clinton's scores take a hit for not being attractive enough to independent voters to prevent them from going over to Perot. Just my two cents. Your point is entirely valid. It would just be a bit beyond my technical expertise to try and excise all of the "confounding variables" from the data.

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, *1972-2016* [OC] delugetheory 6 points ago in dataisbeautiful

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 1972 to 2016. The candidate who had the highest percentage (in any election year) is the "winner." I chose 1972 as the cut-off date because it was the first election to take place after the 26th Amendment, which expanded the electorate to include all US citizens over the age of 18.

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, so for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 1972-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, *1972-2016* [OC] delugetheory 5 points ago in MapPorn

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 1972 to 2016. The candidate who had the highest percentage (in any election year) is the "winner." I chose 1972 as the cut-off date because it was the first election to take place after the 26th Amendment, which expanded the electorate to include all US citizens over the age of 18.

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, so for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 1972-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, *1972-2016* [OC] delugetheory 4 points ago in Map_Porn

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 1972 to 2016. The candidate who had the highest percentage (in any election year) is the "winner." I chose 1972 as the cut-off date because it was the first election to take place after the 26th Amendment, which expanded the electorate to include all US citizens over the age of 18.

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, so for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 1972-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Most Historically *Unpopular* Presid delugetheory 5 points ago in Map_Porn

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 1972 to 2016. The candidate who had the lowest percentage (in any election year) is the "loser." I chose 1972 as the cut-off date because it was the first election to take place after the 26th Amendment, which expanded the electorate to include all US citizens over the age of 18.

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, so for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 1972-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Most Historically *Unpopular* Presidential Candidate by State, 1972-2016 [OC] delugetheory 24 points ago in MapPorn

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 1972 to 2016. The candidate who had the lowest percentage (in any election year) is the "loser." I chose 1972 as the cut-off date because it was the first election to take place after the 26th Amendment, which expanded the electorate to include all US citizens over the age of 18.

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, so for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 1972-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Most Historically *Unpopular* Presidential Candidate by State, 1972-2016 [OC] delugetheory 16 points ago in dataisbeautiful

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 1972 to 2016. The candidate who had the lowest percentage (in any election year) is the "loser." I chose 1972 as the cut-off date because it was the first election to take place after the 26th Amendment, which expanded the electorate to include all US citizens over the age of 18.

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, so for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 1972-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Social States of America: State Lines Redrawn Based on Online Social Networks (Source article in comments) delugetheory 7 points ago * (lasted edited 6 days ago) in Map_Porn

    In darker regions, more of the residents' social connections are within the region itself. In the lighter regions, residents are more likely to have connections with outside regions.

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, 2000-2016 [OC] delugetheory 3 points ago in dataisbeautiful

    That's a good point, and I will take it into consideration for any future versions. I ran the data to see how this map would have looked different without Bush '04 or Obama '12.

    For Obama, it made no difference. Obama was more popular in 2008 than in 2012, so all of the states where he "wins" on this map are from 2008 and stay put.

    For Bush, it doesn't go so well. In fact, he loses every state he holds on this map. Alaska, Georgia, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Wyoming go to McCain. Idaho and Utah, the Mormon heartland, go to Romney. The rest -- Indiana, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota go to Trump.

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, 2000-2016 [OC] delugetheory 16 points ago in MapPorn

    In my opinion, no. My reasoning is -- let's say there in an island of ten people, and they have an election for King of the Island. It's Joe vs. Jim. Nobody actually likes Joe or Jim, so only two people vote. Joe, being the slightly less unlikable of the two, gets both votes and, thus, 100% of the vote.

    The next election, it's Joe vs. a new up-and-comer, Alice. Alice is actually somewhat liked and gets five votes. Joe gets one vote. Alice has won 83% of the vote. But Joe had won 100% of the vote in the last election... so would you say that Joe was more popular than Alice is? Personally, I wouldn't.

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, 2000-2016 [OC] delugetheory 7 points ago in Map_Porn

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 2000 to 2016.  The candidate who had the highest percentage (in any election year) is the "winner."

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, and I am currently working on a second version which will incorporate more past election years. So, for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 2000-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP

    [–] Most Historically Popular Presidential Candidate by State, 2000-2016 [OC] delugetheory 11 points ago in MapPorn

    For this map, I found the percentage of each state's total population voting for each candidate in all presidential elections from 2000 to 2016.  The candidate who had the highest percentage (in any election year) is the "winner."

    I realize that it would be more ideal to use the actual eligible voting population, rather than the total population, but I have been unable to find that data further back than 2000, and I am currently working on a second version which will incorporate more past election years. So, for the sake of uniformity, I have gone with total population. I do not believe that this greatly affects the results, at least not in the 2000-2016 time frame.

    Data sources: Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections; Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (historical state population data)

    Tools: Excel, MapChart, GIMP