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    [–] Did Inca people really dress like this? jschooltiger 6 points ago in AskHistorians

    You could also ask this question over at r/MuseumPros. Worth a shot.

    [–] USS Kearsarge in Boston, c. 1900 [3000 x 2392] jschooltiger 4 points ago in WarshipPorn

    Yep, BB-5 was that same ship (also the only US battleship not to be named after a state). She was an Atlantic Fleet ship but sailed around the world with the Great White Fleet.

    [–] To our knowledge, have any wars been stopped by an assassination? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Sorry, we don't allow "example seeking" questions. It's not that your question was bad; it's that these kinds of questions tend to produce threads that are collections of disjointed, partial, inadequate responses. If you have a question about a specific historical event, period, or person, feel free to rewrite your question and submit it again. If you don't want to rewrite it, you might try submitting it to /r/history, /r/askhistory, or /r/tellmeafact.

    For further explanation of the rule, feel free to consult this META thread.

    [–] Why did Britain not navally invade France during the Napoleonic Wars? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Is there any chance you'd be willing to flesh out the AskHistorians reading list for the Napoleonic era? It seems ridiculous that there are only 6 books listed there. Haven't there been something like a quarter million books on the topic?

    1) This is the current books list for the Napoleonic era.

    The French Revolution & The Napoleonic Wars

    Revolutionary Era

    • The Days of the French Revolution by Christopher Hibbert is a good general history but not the best as it's general semi-pop history.

    • Engineering the Revolution: Arms & Enlightenment in France, 1763-1815 by Ken Alder, which focuses on the technological, social, and political aspects of retooling the French military to better fight in the future, which is important for later dominance under Napoleon's rule.

    • French Society in Revolution: 1789-1799 by David Andress is a more historical survey on society during the Revolution.

    • Twelve Who Ruled: The Year of the Terror in the French Revolution by R. R. Palmer which is one of the standard histories of the Terror, but again more of a professional history.

    • The Cult of the Nation in France: Inventing Nationalism, 1680-1800 by David A. Bell is a professional history on an aspect of the French Revolution that isn't focused on enough (in the larger discussions of the Revolution) but covers more than just the Revolution. It's important for the larger understanding of the Nationalizing aspect of the Revolution.

    • The Bayonets of the Republic: Motivation and Tactics in the Army of Revolutionary France, 1791-94 by John A. Lynn is one of the best books about the Revolutionary armies and how they fought/were made up of.

    • Contesting the French Revolution by Paul R. Hanson is a good series of essays about several aspects of the Revolution that I had to use in a class of mine, good but a little hard to read.

    • The People's Armies by Richard Cobb is a deep and detailed look at the Revolutionary Armies but I would still put Lynn's at the top for that.

    • The French Nobility in the Eighteenth Century: From Feudalism to Enlightenment by Guy Chaussiand-Nogaret

    • The French revolution: Recent Debates & New Controversies Edited by Gary Kates

    • Fragile Lives: Violence, Power and Solidarity in Eighteenth-Century Paris by Arlette Farge

    Napoleonic Era

    • The Campaigns of Napoleon* by David G. Chandler. If there must be a Bible about the Napoleonic Wars, it is this. Well written, easy to read, and balanced around a difficult figure, Chandler gives a campaign history of Napoleon as a commander as well as giving the understanding of the tactics and style of war during the time period. Writing in the 70s, Chandler gives a proper history of Napoleon as a commander that has yet to be matched. Note: This is a campaign history of Napoleon as a commander, so wars such as the Peninsular Wars get only a light detailing during Napoleon's involvement due to the focus on Napoleon.

    • March of the Twenty-Six by R. F. Delderfield. Rather than focusing on Napoleon, this book focuses on the Imperial Marshalate from the very beginning of each members service and gives a touching last chapter that gives the last years of each Marshal. Filled with anecdotal stories, it is a good introduction into the Napoleonic Wars themselves as it follows the more well known commanders and their personalities.

    • Napoleon's Cavalry and its Leaders by David Johnson. This is recommended for an understanding of one of the French army's best arms, the cavalry. Known for their dash and ferocity, French cavalry was a very important arm that helped secure domination of the field and gave the French an added boost to mobility. This discusses different types of cavalry and it's tactics as well as the famous leaders (such as Lasalle and Murat) and recommended for appreciation for the French cavalry.

    • Napoleon's Great Adversary: Archduke Charles and the Austrian Army, 1792-1814 by Gunther E. Rothenberg. Written by one of the best historians on the Austrian Army, this book focuses on the Austrian armies attempt to fight Napoleon and the reforms undertaken between each defeat. This is recommended for the intermediate Napoleonic reader to understand why the Austrians never preformed well on the battlefield yet kept on coming back to it.

    • Napoleon's Marshals Ed. by David G. Chandler. Rather than a proper history, this is a series of articles on each individual Marshal of Napoleon written by major Napoleonic scholars in the 80s. Here you'll find an essay on Augereau by Elting, an essay on Davout by Chandler, and an essay by Lefebvre by Rothenberg. Each essay gives a biographical essay of each Marshal and ends with an in depth analysis of a major battle of each Marshal to detail that Marshal's skill and ability. Recommended are the essays on Davout and Suchet.

    • Swords Around A Throne: Napoleon's Grande Armee by John R. Elting. This tome on the Grande Armee is a very approachable yet detailed discourse on the composition and inner workings of Napoleon's greatest army. Packed with anecdotal stories, it gives a functional history of the army that Napoleon led rather than an operational history, explaining how each different service worked within the army and how it grew to it's height. Covering everything from the navy to logistics, this is a good book to catch for and understanding of the army.

    2) You've been warned multiple times about being rude and abrasive with our users, and you are currently asking one of our most valuable contributors to contribute even more of their valuable, completely voluntary time to service your needs.

    You have been banned from AskHistorians. The ban is permanent and will not be overturned.

    [–] How many dialects were deliberately cultivated throughout history? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Sorry, we don't allow "example seeking" questions. It's not that your question was bad; it's that these kinds of questions tend to produce threads that are collections of disjointed, partial, inadequate responses. If you have a question about a specific historical event, period, or person, feel free to rewrite your question and submit it again. If you don't want to rewrite it, you might try submitting it to /r/history, /r/askhistory, or /r/tellmeafact.

    For further explanation of the rule, feel free to consult this META thread.

    [–] How did the cloth trade singlehandedly stabilise the English economy during the reign of Henry VII? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Hello there. Unfortunately we have had to remove your question as it looks like it may be a homework question. A couple of things to keep in mind about this: Our rules DO permit people to ask for help with their homework, so long as they are seeking clarification or resources, rather than the answer itself. Also: Sometimes flairs can be reluctant to answer a question that looks like homework, because they don't want to be involved in plagiarism (and sadly, yes, there are those who plagiarize reddit comments).

    But, that all said, many of our users do enjoy helping out with suggestions for resources and further reading. Can you tell us what you've researched so far, what resources you've consulted, and what you've learned? If that doesn't work, you can also consider asking the helpful people at /r/HomeworkHelp. If you edit your post to be in compliance with our requirements for homework related questions, which are explored in more detail in this META Thread, we would be happy to restore it.

    Additionally, we would highly suggest that you check out our six part series on 'Finding and Understanding Sources', which might prove to be useful in your research.

    [–] How true is it that British soldiers were "Lions led by donkeys"? jschooltiger 3 points ago in AskHistorians

    Hello there. Your question seems to be related to school work, so we just want to remind you, and any potential respondents, that our rules DO permit people to ask for help with their homework, so long as they are seeking clarification or resources, rather than the answer itself. This policy is further explained in this META Thread.

    Additionally, while our users may be able to help you out here, we hope that you also will take the time to check out our six-part series, "Finding and Understanding Sources", which should hopefully prove to be helpful for you as you continue in your research.

    [–] What is the oldest surviving work from each of the major forms of mass media? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    I'm sorry, but we don't allow 'First'/'Last' questions on /r/AskHistorians, and so we have removed this submission. It's not that the question is bad; it is simply that, given the rules of this subreddit, these types of questions are ill-suited to its format. We've found that they tend to get responses along the lines of "the first/last example I know of," or else many short, speculative responses in the case that the answer went unrecorded. This results in many removed comments, and very few answered threads.

    If this is a question you still are interested in a response to though, you have options!

    • Consider the core of the question to rephrase and resubmit. Instead of asking, for instance, "Who was the first person killed by a firearm?", try "What do we know about the early development and use of firearms?". Asking about origins, developments, or declines is more likely to get in-depth, knowledgeable answers.

    • Every other Wednesday we run a "Short Answers to Simple Questions", and if you can hang on to your question until then, it can likely fit unchanged.

    • Finally, you could also try submitting your question to /r/History or /r/AskHistory, which doesn't have submission criteria quite as strict.

    Thank you for understanding!

    [–] What governs the raise and fall cyclic relationship of cultures' acceptance of homosexuality? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Sorry, your question was removed for being out of scope here. From our rules:

    Submissions to /r/AskHistorians must be either:

    • A question about the human past

    • A meta post about the state of the subreddit. Anyone may start a meta post, but please check with the moderators if you aren't sure you're using the label correctly. Short questions (e.g. clarification of moderation policy) that don't require discussion are better sent to the mods directly.

    • An AMA ("Ask Me Anything") with a historical expert or panel of experts. These should be arranged with the moderators beforehand – please message us if you're interested.

    The moderators also post weekly feature posts on a variety of themes.

    The issue with this question is that it's asking about all of history, over time. You might have better luck at a subreddit such as AskSocialScience or AskAnthropology.

    Thanks!

    [–] Which historians should I follow on Twitter? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Sorry, your question was removed for being out of scope here. From our rules:

    Submissions to /r/AskHistorians must be either:

    • A question about the human past

    • A meta post about the state of the subreddit. Anyone may start a meta post, but please check with the moderators if you aren't sure you're using the label correctly. Short questions (e.g. clarification of moderation policy) that don't require discussion are better sent to the mods directly.

    • An AMA ("Ask Me Anything") with a historical expert or panel of experts. These should be arranged with the moderators beforehand – please message us if you're interested.

    The moderators also post weekly feature posts on a variety of themes.

    You could always try asking this in our Friday Free-for-All feature.

    [–] How did "tax havens" emerge? Was it created consciously by the Government of that country/territory? Which region, if any, was the world's first tax haven? jschooltiger 119 points ago in AskHistorians

    I’m far from an expert or even novice on this subject but a quick google search found me this

    Please understand that people come here because they want an informed response from someone capable of engaging with the sources, and providing follow up information. Google is a great tool, but simply pointing to the top hit doesn't provide the type of answers we seek to encourage here. As such, we don't allow a Google link or Googled quote to make up the entirety or majority of a response. If someone wishes to simply get the answer from Google, they are welcome to look into it for themselves, but posting here is a presumption that they either don't want to get the answer that way, or have already done so and found it lacking. You can find further discussion of this policy here.

    In the future, please take the time to better familiarize yourself with the rules, and be sure that your answer demonstrates these four key points:

    • Do I have the expertise needed to answer this question?
    • Have I done research on this question?
    • Can I cite my sources?
    • Can I answer follow-up questions?

    Thank you!

    [–] If the Amber Room has indeed been rediscovered, what will become of the reconstructed Amber Room in St. Petersburg? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    This submission has been removed because it violates our '20-Year Rule'. To discourage off-topic discussions of current events, questions, answers and all other comments must be confined to events that happened 20 years ago or more. For further explanation of this rule, feel free to consult this Rules Roundtable.

    You could always try this question over at r/MuseumPros

    [–] What, in medieval times, was considered a dick move? jschooltiger 1 points ago in AskHistorians

    Sorry, we don't allow "example seeking" questions. It's not that your question was bad; it's that these kinds of questions tend to produce threads that are collections of disjointed, partial, inadequate responses. If you have a question about a specific historical event, period, or person, feel free to rewrite your question and submit it again. If you don't want to rewrite it, you might try submitting it to /r/history, /r/askhistory, or /r/tellmeafact.

    For further explanation of the rule, feel free to consult this META thread.

    [–] The Opium Wars of the 19th century, fought between China and Britain and won by the latter, was perhaps the first time China was exposed to a vastly superior military force in its history. How did this affect the historically dominant Chinese psyche in the years following the wars? jschooltiger 5 points ago in AskHistorians

    Hi there -- no one on the mod-team noticed the post for several hours. Instead of complaining about it here, we would prefer you use the "report" button to bring it to our attention, or send us a mod-mail by using the "message the mods" button in the sidebar. That said, the offending post and its children have been removed, and if you would like to ask questions Chinese historiography, that would be welcomed here (though it's not a META topic -- sub rules and the like are.) Thanks!

    [–] How did Hawaiians slice their pineapples without modern sharp knives? jschooltiger 2 points ago in AskHistorians

    Hi there, we've removed this question as it rests on a false premise (pineapples aren't native to Hawaii). You could always try asking about pre-modern tools over in r/AskAnthropology, though.