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    [–] 3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself. Using the information, researchers replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects, ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT), and facilitate development of self-replicating machines. mvea 1 points ago in Futurology

    The title of the post is a copy and paste from the title and first paragraph of the linked academic press release here:

    3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself

    Using the information, researchers have replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting the potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects.

    And the following parts of the abstract of the journal article:

    We devised a ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT) storage architecture to produce materials with immutable memory.

    It may also facilitate the development of self-replicating machines.

    Journal Reference:

    Koch, J., Gantenbein, S., Masania, K. et al.

    A DNA-of-things storage architecture to create materials with embedded memory.

    Nature Biotechnology (2019)

    Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41587-019-0356-z

    doi:10.1038/s41587-019-0356-z

    Abstract

    DNA storage offers substantial information density1,2,3,4,5,6,7 and exceptional half-life3. We devised a ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT) storage architecture to produce materials with immutable memory. In a DoT framework, DNA molecules record the data, and these molecules are then encapsulated in nanometer silica beads8, which are fused into various materials that are used to print or cast objects in any shape. First, we applied DoT to three-dimensionally print a Stanford Bunny9 that contained a 45 kB digital DNA blueprint for its synthesis. We synthesized five generations of the bunny, each from the memory of the previous generation without additional DNA synthesis or degradation of information. To test the scalability of DoT, we stored a 1.4 MB video in DNA in plexiglass spectacle lenses and retrieved it by excising a tiny piece of the plexiglass and sequencing the embedded DNA. DoT could be applied to store electronic health records in medical implants, to hide data in everyday objects (steganography) and to manufacture objects containing their own blueprint. It may also facilitate the development of self-replicating machines.

    [–] 3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself. Using the information, researchers replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects, ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT), and facilitate development of self-replicating machines. mvea 1 points ago in science

    The title of the post is a copy and paste from the title and first paragraph of the linked academic press release here:

    3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself

    Using the information, researchers have replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting the potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects.

    And the following parts of the abstract of the journal article:

    We devised a ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT) storage architecture to produce materials with immutable memory.

    It may also facilitate the development of self-replicating machines.

    Journal Reference:

    Koch, J., Gantenbein, S., Masania, K. et al.

    A DNA-of-things storage architecture to create materials with embedded memory.

    Nature Biotechnology (2019)

    Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41587-019-0356-z

    doi:10.1038/s41587-019-0356-z

    Abstract

    DNA storage offers substantial information density1,2,3,4,5,6,7 and exceptional half-life3. We devised a ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT) storage architecture to produce materials with immutable memory. In a DoT framework, DNA molecules record the data, and these molecules are then encapsulated in nanometer silica beads8, which are fused into various materials that are used to print or cast objects in any shape. First, we applied DoT to three-dimensionally print a Stanford Bunny9 that contained a 45 kB digital DNA blueprint for its synthesis. We synthesized five generations of the bunny, each from the memory of the previous generation without additional DNA synthesis or degradation of information. To test the scalability of DoT, we stored a 1.4 MB video in DNA in plexiglass spectacle lenses and retrieved it by excising a tiny piece of the plexiglass and sequencing the embedded DNA. DoT could be applied to store electronic health records in medical implants, to hide data in everyday objects (steganography) and to manufacture objects containing their own blueprint. It may also facilitate the development of self-replicating machines.

    [–] A 3D-printed polyester rabbit has been embedded with DNA that contains a blueprint to make copies of itself. Using the information, researchers have replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting the potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects - the “DNA-of-things” storage. mvea 1 points ago in science

    The title of the post is a copy and paste from the title and first paragraph of the linked academic press release here:

    3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself

    A 3D-printed polyester rabbit has been embedded with DNA that contains a blueprint for printing additional bunnies. Using the information, researchers have replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting the potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects.

    And the title of the journal article:

    A DNA-of-things storage architecture to create materials with embedded memory

    Journal Reference:

    Koch, J., Gantenbein, S., Masania, K. et al.

    A DNA-of-things storage architecture to create materials with embedded memory.

    Nature Biotechnology (2019)

    Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41587-019-0356-z

    doi:10.1038/s41587-019-0356-z

    Abstract

    DNA storage offers substantial information density1,2,3,4,5,6,7 and exceptional half-life3. We devised a ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT) storage architecture to produce materials with immutable memory. In a DoT framework, DNA molecules record the data, and these molecules are then encapsulated in nanometer silica beads8, which are fused into various materials that are used to print or cast objects in any shape. First, we applied DoT to three-dimensionally print a Stanford Bunny9 that contained a 45 kB digital DNA blueprint for its synthesis. We synthesized five generations of the bunny, each from the memory of the previous generation without additional DNA synthesis or degradation of information. To test the scalability of DoT, we stored a 1.4 MB video in DNA in plexiglass spectacle lenses and retrieved it by excising a tiny piece of the plexiglass and sequencing the embedded DNA. DoT could be applied to store electronic health records in medical implants, to hide data in everyday objects (steganography) and to manufacture objects containing their own blueprint. It may also facilitate the development of self-replicating machines.

    [–] The natural terpenes in marijuana are removed during distillation to produce pure THC in e-liquids for vaping, and then added back in for taste and smell, but they can produce toxic chemicals in the vapor users inhale, such as benzene, methacrolein, xylenes, toluene, styrene and ethylbenzene. mvea 2 points ago in Health

    The post title is a copy and paste from the subtitle, first and fourth paragraphs of the linked popular press article here:

    The natural terpenes in marijuana are removed during distillation to produce pure THC for e-liquids and concentrates, and then added back in for taste and smell.

    Natural compounds added to marijuana-derived vaping liquid produce toxic chemicals in the vapor that users inhale, a new lab study reports.

    Those chemicals included benzene, a known carcinogen, and an air pollutant called methacrolein, Strongin said. Others included xylenes, toluene, styrene and ethylbenzene.

    Journal Reference:

    Jiries Meehan-Atrash, Wentai Luo, Kevin J. McWhirter, Robert M. Strongin.

    Aerosol Gas-Phase Components from Cannabis E-Cigarettes and Dabbing: Mechanistic Insight and Quantitative Risk Analysis.

    ACS Omega, 2019; 4 (14): 16111

    Link: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsomega.9b02301

    DOI: 10.1021/acsomega.9b02301

    Abstract

    Consumption of cannabis by nontraditional methods has surged since the advent of legalization in North America and worldwide. Inhaling cannabis extracts using vaporizers and via dabbing has risen in popularity, while concerns over product safety have not hindered their proliferation. The work herein is the first step toward assessing the safety of vaporizing and dabbing concentrated cannabis extracts as a function of gas-phase reaction products. The gas-phase thermal degradants of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have not been previously investigated. It was found that users may be exposed to concerning degradants such as methacrolein, benzene, and methyl vinyl ketone when using cartridge vaporizers and dabbing. It was shown that THC alone and mixed with terpenes generated similar degradation products and, most notably, elevated levels of isoprene. Importantly, it was shown that added terpenes led to higher levels of gas-phase products compared to THC alone. To estimate cancer and noncancer risks associated with exposure to these and other degradants, quantitative risk assessment was applied to experimentally determined values for dabbing and vaping and literature-sourced levels of hazardous components in cannabis smoke. Overall, gas-phase aerosol products had significantly lower values in dabbing and vaporizing compared to cannabis smoking, although these results should be interpreted in light of potential variations in degradant levels due to disparate usage patterns and the dangers of the higher aerosol concentration of THC.

    [–] The natural terpenes in marijuana are removed during distillation to produce pure THC in e-liquids for vaping, and then added back in for taste and smell, but they can produce toxic chemicals in the vapor users inhale, such as benzene, methacrolein, xylenes, toluene, styrene and ethylbenzene. mvea 43 points ago in science

    The post title is a copy and paste from the subtitle, first and fourth paragraphs of the linked popular press article here:

    The natural terpenes in marijuana are removed during distillation to produce pure THC for e-liquids and concentrates, and then added back in for taste and smell.

    Natural compounds added to marijuana-derived vaping liquid produce toxic chemicals in the vapor that users inhale, a new lab study reports.

    Those chemicals included benzene, a known carcinogen, and an air pollutant called methacrolein, Strongin said. Others included xylenes, toluene, styrene and ethylbenzene.

    Journal Reference:

    Jiries Meehan-Atrash, Wentai Luo, Kevin J. McWhirter, Robert M. Strongin.

    Aerosol Gas-Phase Components from Cannabis E-Cigarettes and Dabbing: Mechanistic Insight and Quantitative Risk Analysis.

    ACS Omega, 2019; 4 (14): 16111

    Link: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsomega.9b02301

    DOI: 10.1021/acsomega.9b02301

    Abstract

    Consumption of cannabis by nontraditional methods has surged since the advent of legalization in North America and worldwide. Inhaling cannabis extracts using vaporizers and via dabbing has risen in popularity, while concerns over product safety have not hindered their proliferation. The work herein is the first step toward assessing the safety of vaporizing and dabbing concentrated cannabis extracts as a function of gas-phase reaction products. The gas-phase thermal degradants of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have not been previously investigated. It was found that users may be exposed to concerning degradants such as methacrolein, benzene, and methyl vinyl ketone when using cartridge vaporizers and dabbing. It was shown that THC alone and mixed with terpenes generated similar degradation products and, most notably, elevated levels of isoprene. Importantly, it was shown that added terpenes led to higher levels of gas-phase products compared to THC alone. To estimate cancer and noncancer risks associated with exposure to these and other degradants, quantitative risk assessment was applied to experimentally determined values for dabbing and vaping and literature-sourced levels of hazardous components in cannabis smoke. Overall, gas-phase aerosol products had significantly lower values in dabbing and vaporizing compared to cannabis smoking, although these results should be interpreted in light of potential variations in degradant levels due to disparate usage patterns and the dangers of the higher aerosol concentration of THC.

    [–] Quantum states in conventional electronics may beat end of Moore's law, reports a new study in Science. Scientists found a way to produce quantum states in ordinary, everyday electronics, which raises the possibility that quantum information technologies can be created using current devices. mvea 0 points ago in Futurology

    The title of the post is a copy and paste from the title and first paragraph of the linked academic press release here:

    Quantum states in conventional electronics may beat end of Moore's law

    Scientists at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering have found a way to produce quantum states in ordinary, everyday electronics. By harnessing the properties of quantum mechanics without exotic materials or equipment, this raises the possibility that quantum information technologies can be created using current devices.

    Journal Reference:

    Electrical and optical control of single spins integrated in scalable semiconductor devices

    Christopher P. Anderson, Alexandre Bourassa, Kevin C. Miao, Gary Wolfowicz, Peter J. Mintun, Alexander L. Crook, Hiroshi Abe, Jawad Ul Hassan, Nguyen T. Son, Takeshi Ohshima, David D. Awschalom

    Science 06 Dec 2019: Vol. 366, Issue 6470, pp. 1225-1230

    Link: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6470/1225

    DOI: 10.1126/science.aax9406

    Divacancies in a diode

    Solid-state defects hold great promise as the building blocks for quantum computers. Most research has focused on defects in diamond, which are difficult to integrate with existing semiconductor technologies. An alternative two-vacancy neutral defect in silicon carbide (SiC) has a long coherence time but suffers from broad optical linewidths and charge instability. Anderson et al. fabricated these defects in a diode made out of commercially available SiC. Reverse voltage created large electric fields within the diode, tuning the frequencies of the defect's transitions by hundreds of gigahertz. The electric fields also caused charge depletion, leading to a dramatic narrowing of the transitions. The technique should be readily generalizable to other quantum defects.

    Science, this issue p. 1225

    Abstract

    Spin defects in silicon carbide have the advantage of exceptional electron spin coherence combined with a near-infrared spin-photon interface, all in a material amenable to modern semiconductor fabrication. Leveraging these advantages, we integrated highly coherent single neutral divacancy spins in commercially available p-i-n structures and fabricated diodes to modulate the local electrical environment of the defects. These devices enable deterministic charge-state control and broad Stark-shift tuning exceeding 850 gigahertz. We show that charge depletion results in a narrowing of the optical linewidths by more than 50-fold, approaching the lifetime limit. These results demonstrate a method for mitigating the ubiquitous problem of spectral diffusion in solid-state emitters by engineering the electrical environment while using classical semiconductor devices to control scalable, spin-based quantum systems.

    [–] Quantum states in conventional electronics may beat end of Moore's law, reports a new study in Science. Scientists found a way to produce quantum states in ordinary, everyday electronics, which raises the possibility that quantum information technologies can be created using current devices. mvea 1 points ago in science

    The title of the post is a copy and paste from the title and first paragraph of the linked academic press release here:

    Quantum states in conventional electronics may beat end of Moore's law

    Scientists at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering have found a way to produce quantum states in ordinary, everyday electronics. By harnessing the properties of quantum mechanics without exotic materials or equipment, this raises the possibility that quantum information technologies can be created using current devices.

    Journal Reference:

    Electrical and optical control of single spins integrated in scalable semiconductor devices

    Christopher P. Anderson, Alexandre Bourassa, Kevin C. Miao, Gary Wolfowicz, Peter J. Mintun, Alexander L. Crook, Hiroshi Abe, Jawad Ul Hassan, Nguyen T. Son, Takeshi Ohshima, David D. Awschalom

    Science 06 Dec 2019: Vol. 366, Issue 6470, pp. 1225-1230

    Link: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6470/1225

    DOI: 10.1126/science.aax9406

    Divacancies in a diode

    Solid-state defects hold great promise as the building blocks for quantum computers. Most research has focused on defects in diamond, which are difficult to integrate with existing semiconductor technologies. An alternative two-vacancy neutral defect in silicon carbide (SiC) has a long coherence time but suffers from broad optical linewidths and charge instability. Anderson et al. fabricated these defects in a diode made out of commercially available SiC. Reverse voltage created large electric fields within the diode, tuning the frequencies of the defect's transitions by hundreds of gigahertz. The electric fields also caused charge depletion, leading to a dramatic narrowing of the transitions. The technique should be readily generalizable to other quantum defects.

    Science, this issue p. 1225

    Abstract

    Spin defects in silicon carbide have the advantage of exceptional electron spin coherence combined with a near-infrared spin-photon interface, all in a material amenable to modern semiconductor fabrication. Leveraging these advantages, we integrated highly coherent single neutral divacancy spins in commercially available p-i-n structures and fabricated diodes to modulate the local electrical environment of the defects. These devices enable deterministic charge-state control and broad Stark-shift tuning exceeding 850 gigahertz. We show that charge depletion results in a narrowing of the optical linewidths by more than 50-fold, approaching the lifetime limit. These results demonstrate a method for mitigating the ubiquitous problem of spectral diffusion in solid-state emitters by engineering the electrical environment while using classical semiconductor devices to control scalable, spin-based quantum systems.

    [–] Ten-hour time-restricted eating (fasting for 14-hours) reduces weight, blood pressure, and atherogenic lipids in patients with metabolic syndrome, finds a new pilot study. It is a potentially powerful lifestyle intervention that can be added to standard medical practice to treat metabolic syndrome. mvea 2 points ago in Health

    I’ve deliberately linked to the original source journal article that is open access and full-text.

    The title of my post is a copy and paste from the linked journal article here:

    Title of journal article:

    Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Last sentence of abstract:

    TRE is a potentially powerful lifestyle intervention that can be added to standard medical practice to treat metabolic syndrome.

    Citation:

    Michael J. Wilkinson, Emily N.C. Manoogian, Adena Zadourian, Hannah Lo, Savannah Fakhouri, Azarin Shoghi, Xinran Wang, Jason G. Fleischer, Saket Navlakha, Satchidananda Panda, Pam R. Taub,

    Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome,

    Cell Metabolism,2019,ISSN 1550-4131,

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.004.

    [–] Ten-hour time-restricted eating (fasting for 14-hours) reduces weight, blood pressure, and atherogenic lipids in patients with metabolic syndrome, finds a new pilot study. It is a potentially powerful lifestyle intervention that can be added to standard medical practice to treat metabolic syndrome. mvea 3 points ago in science

    I’ve deliberately linked to the original source journal article that is open access and full-text.

    The title of my post is a copy and paste from the linked journal article here:

    Title of journal article:

    Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Last sentence of abstract:

    TRE is a potentially powerful lifestyle intervention that can be added to standard medical practice to treat metabolic syndrome.

    Citation:

    Michael J. Wilkinson, Emily N.C. Manoogian, Adena Zadourian, Hannah Lo, Savannah Fakhouri, Azarin Shoghi, Xinran Wang, Jason G. Fleischer, Saket Navlakha, Satchidananda Panda, Pam R. Taub,

    Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome,

    Cell Metabolism,2019,ISSN 1550-4131,

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.004.