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    smurfyjenkins

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    [–] APSR study: In the US, liberals are more willing to grant legitimacy to governments led by conservatives than vice versa. Furthermore, conservatives demonstrate more trust in government when it's led by conservatives than liberals trust government when it's led by liberals. smurfyjenkins 2 points ago in neoliberal

    Abstract:

    When political polarization is high, it may be assumed that citizens will trust the government more when the chief executive shares their own political views. However, evidence is accumulating that important asymmetries may exist between liberals and conservatives (or Democrats and Republicans). We hypothesized that an asymmetry may exist when it comes to individuals’ willingness to trust the government when it is led by the “other side.” In an extensive analysis of several major datasets (including ANES and GSS) over a period of five decades, we find that in the United States, conservatives trust the government more than liberals when the president in office shares their own ideology. Furthermore, liberals are more willing to grant legitimacy to democratic governments led by conservatives than vice versa. A similar asymmetry applies to Republicans compared with Democrats. We discuss implications of this asymmetrical “president-in-power” effect for democratic functioning.

    If you can't access the article, here's the figure that summarizes the findings.

    [–] In the US, liberals are more willing to grant legitimacy to governments led by conservatives than vice versa. Furthermore, conservatives demonstrate more trust in government when it's led by conservatives than liberals trust government when it's led by liberals. smurfyjenkins 1 points ago in science

    Abstract:

    When political polarization is high, it may be assumed that citizens will trust the government more when the chief executive shares their own political views. However, evidence is accumulating that important asymmetries may exist between liberals and conservatives (or Democrats and Republicans). We hypothesized that an asymmetry may exist when it comes to individuals’ willingness to trust the government when it is led by the “other side.” In an extensive analysis of several major datasets (including ANES and GSS) over a period of five decades, we find that in the United States, conservatives trust the government more than liberals when the president in office shares their own ideology. Furthermore, liberals are more willing to grant legitimacy to democratic governments led by conservatives than vice versa. A similar asymmetry applies to Republicans compared with Democrats. We discuss implications of this asymmetrical “president-in-power” effect for democratic functioning.

    If you can't access the article, here's the figure that summarizes the findings.

    [–] Aggressive policing reduces the educational performance of African American boys smurfyjenkins 12 points ago in science

    Abstract:

    An increasing number of minority youth experience contact with the criminal justice system. But how does the expansion of police presence in poor urban communities affect educational outcomes? Previous research points at multiple mechanisms with opposing effects. This article presents the first causal evidence of the impact of aggressive policing on minority youths’ educational performance. Under Operation Impact, the New York Police Department (NYPD) saturated high-crime areas with additional police officers with the mission to engage in aggressive, order-maintenance policing. To estimate the effect of this policing program, we use administrative data from more than 250,000 adolescents age 9 to 15 and a difference-in-differences approach based on variation in the timing of police surges across neighborhoods. We find that exposure to police surges significantly reduced test scores for African American boys, consistent with their greater exposure to policing. The size of the effect increases with age, but there is no discernible effect for African American girls and Hispanic students. Aggressive policing can thus lower educational performance for some minority groups. These findings provide evidence that the consequences of policing extend into key domains of social life, with implications for the educational trajectories of minority youth and social inequality more broadly.

    Preprint version.

    [–] Rising temperatures have led to a modest increase in public concern about climate change, "but a warming climate, on its own, is unlikely to yield a consensus in the mass public about the threat posed by climate change." smurfyjenkins 1 points ago in science

    Abstract:

    Scholars have not determined whether exposure to a changing climate influences public understanding of or concern about climate change. We examine this question using a comprehensive index of public concern about climate change in each state from 1999 to 2017. The index aggregates data from over 400,000 survey respondents in 170 polls. These new estimates of state-level climate concern enable us to exploit geographic variation in locally experienced climate changes over an extended time period. We show that climate concern peaked in 2000 and again in 2017 and that climate concern is modestly responsive to changes in state-level temperatures. Overall, our results suggest that continued increases in temperature are likely to cause public concern about climate change to grow in the future. But a warming climate, on its own, is unlikely to yield a consensus in the mass public about the threat posed by climate change.

    Working paper version.