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    [–] Jared Kushner Told White House Meeting Andrew Cuomo Was Being Alarmist: 'New York Doesn't Need All The Ventilators'-Report technical_assistance 203 points ago in politics

    Early in the pandemic:

    Mr. Kushner’s early involvement with dealing with the virus was in advising the president that the media’s coverage exaggerated the threat.

    Later in the pandemic:

    Trump’s view that he can ignore Fauci’s opinion may be influenced by advice he’s getting from Jared Kushner, whose outside-the-box efforts have often rankled those in charge of managing the crisis. According to two sources, Kushner has told Trump about experimental treatments he’s heard about from executives in Silicon Valley. “Jared is bringing conspiracy theories to Trump about potential treatments,” a Republican briefed on the conversations told me. Another former West Wing official told me: “Trump is like an 11-year-old boy waiting for the fairy godmother to bring him a magic pill.” (The White House did not respond to a request for comment.)

    [–] You’ll Never Believe It but Jared Kushner May Have a Coronavirus Conflict of Interest technical_assistance 57 points ago in politics

    Early in the pandemic:

    Mr. Kushner’s early involvement with dealing with the virus was in advising the president that the media’s coverage exaggerated the threat.

    Later in the pandemic:

    Trump’s view that he can ignore Fauci’s opinion may be influenced by advice he’s getting from Jared Kushner, whose outside-the-box efforts have often rankled those in charge of managing the crisis. According to two sources, Kushner has told Trump about experimental treatments he’s heard about from executives in Silicon Valley. “Jared is bringing conspiracy theories to Trump about potential treatments,” a Republican briefed on the conversations told me. Another former West Wing official told me: “Trump is like an 11-year-old boy waiting for the fairy godmother to bring him a magic pill.” (The White House did not respond to a request for comment.)

    [–] Tampa megachurch pastor arrested after leading packed services despite 'safer-at-home' orders technical_assistance 17 points ago in politics

    Different pastor, but it reveals a lot about the thought process:

    “One pastor said half of his church is ready to lick the floor to prove there’s no actual virus,” Rev. Josh King, the lead pastor at Second Baptist church in Conway, Arkansas, told the Post’s reporters. “In your more politically conservative regions, closing is not interpreted as caring for you. It’s interpreted as liberalism, or buying into the hype.”

    [–] Arrest warrant issued for Tampa megachurch pastor who led packed services despite safer-at-home orders technical_assistance 3 points ago in news

    Different pastor, but it reveals a lot about the thought process:

    “One pastor said half of his church is ready to lick the floor to prove there’s no actual virus,” Rev. Josh King, the lead pastor at Second Baptist church in Conway, Arkansas, told the Post’s reporters. “In your more politically conservative regions, closing is not interpreted as caring for you. It’s interpreted as liberalism, or buying into the hype.”

    [–] Trump just comes out and says it: The GOP is hurt when it’s easier to vote technical_assistance 640 points ago in politics

    Mitch McConnell Calls Push to Make Election Day a Holiday a Democratic ‘Power Grab’

    In leaked audio, a top Trump adviser said the Republican party has 'traditionally' relied on voter suppression

    A major Republican redistricting strategist played a role in the Trump administration's push to get a citizenship question on forms for the 2020 census.

    Thomas Hofeller, who died last August, concluded in a 2015 report that adding the question would produce the data needed to redraw political maps that would be "advantageous to Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites," according to a court filing released Thursday.

    “I propose that we draw the maps to give a partisan advantage to 10 Republicans and three Democrats, because I do not believe it’s possible to draw a map with 11 Republicans and two Democrats,” one of us said in 2016, as the North Carolina legislature drew new congressional maps.

    ‘They Don’t Really Want Us to Vote’: How Republicans Made It Harder

    Mr. Johnson is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed last month by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund alleging that rural Waller County has tried to disenfranchise students at the university over decades, most recently by curtailing early voting on campus.

    The polling station at the university’s student center was restricted to three days of early voting, compared with two weeks in some other parts of the county — and two weeks at majority-white Texas A&M in a nearby county. ...

    In North Dakota, Republicans passed an ID law that disproportionally affected Native Americans, strong supporters of the state’s Democratic senator, Heidi Heitkamp, who is in an uphill fight. In Florida, New Hampshire, Texas and Wisconsin, among others, out-of-state university students face unusual hurdles to casting ballots.

    Voting by mail is fair, safe, and easy. Why don’t more states use it?

    The bill has little chance of passage — one of the core truths of US politics is that anything that increases voting turnout hurts Republicans, so they inevitably oppose it. But at the very least it ought to kick up a national conversation about America’s abysmal voting system and one dead-simple way to fix it.

    Two-thirds of Americans (67%) say everything possible should be done to make it easy for every citizen to vote, but Republicans – especially conservative Republicans – are less likely to hold this view, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

    Republicans ideologically divided over making it easy for all to voteWhile Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents (84%) overwhelmingly say everything possible should be done to make it easy to vote, Republicans and GOP leaners are split: Nearly half (48%) say everything possible should be done to make it easy to vote, while 51% say citizens should have to prove they want to vote by registering ahead of time.

    [–] Trump Openly Admits Voting Reforms In COVID Relief Bill Would Endanger Republicans technical_assistance 50 points ago in politics

    Mitch McConnell Calls Push to Make Election Day a Holiday a Democratic ‘Power Grab’

    In leaked audio, a top Trump adviser said the Republican party has 'traditionally' relied on voter suppression

    A major Republican redistricting strategist played a role in the Trump administration's push to get a citizenship question on forms for the 2020 census.

    Thomas Hofeller, who died last August, concluded in a 2015 report that adding the question would produce the data needed to redraw political maps that would be "advantageous to Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites," according to a court filing released Thursday.

    “I propose that we draw the maps to give a partisan advantage to 10 Republicans and three Democrats, because I do not believe it’s possible to draw a map with 11 Republicans and two Democrats,” one of us said in 2016, as the North Carolina legislature drew new congressional maps.

    ‘They Don’t Really Want Us to Vote’: How Republicans Made It Harder

    Mr. Johnson is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed last month by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund alleging that rural Waller County has tried to disenfranchise students at the university over decades, most recently by curtailing early voting on campus.

    The polling station at the university’s student center was restricted to three days of early voting, compared with two weeks in some other parts of the county — and two weeks at majority-white Texas A&M in a nearby county. ...

    In North Dakota, Republicans passed an ID law that disproportionally affected Native Americans, strong supporters of the state’s Democratic senator, Heidi Heitkamp, who is in an uphill fight. In Florida, New Hampshire, Texas and Wisconsin, among others, out-of-state university students face unusual hurdles to casting ballots.

    Voting by mail is fair, safe, and easy. Why don’t more states use it?

    The bill has little chance of passage — one of the core truths of US politics is that anything that increases voting turnout hurts Republicans, so they inevitably oppose it. But at the very least it ought to kick up a national conversation about America’s abysmal voting system and one dead-simple way to fix it.

    Two-thirds of Americans (67%) say everything possible should be done to make it easy for every citizen to vote, but Republicans – especially conservative Republicans – are less likely to hold this view, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

    Republicans ideologically divided over making it easy for all to voteWhile Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents (84%) overwhelmingly say everything possible should be done to make it easy to vote, Republicans and GOP leaners are split: Nearly half (48%) say everything possible should be done to make it easy to vote, while 51% say citizens should have to prove they want to vote by registering ahead of time.

    [–] A top Republican wants to hold off on additional coronavirus aid - Rep. Kevin McCarthy implied further packages might serve to advance Democratic priorities like a Green New Deal and sanctuary city designations. technical_assistance 11 points ago in politics

    This is House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's twitterfeed (including retweets).

    The Trump Administration is taking all the right steps: ✓ Travel restrictions from China & the European Union ✓ Waiving interest on federal student loans ✓ Testing becoming available in Walmart, Target, and pharmacy parking lots all over the country

    Very supportive of President Trump’s declaration of a National Emergency. It’s the right next step to protect our citizens and our economy. Also, GREAT action to overhaul our testing approach with public-private partnerships—millions more tests approved and available soon!

    No mention of why testing has been shit for months and still is, or why there was a delay in declaring an emergency.

    Now is not the time for partisan politics. It's our duty to lead this nation through the #COVID19 threat, and I urge Speaker Pelosi to work with Republicans to put the health and safety of the American people first. Congress must do its job and put forward a bipartisan solution.

    Pelosi wasted the whole week behind closed doors drafting a partisan bill full of liberal fantasies that have nothing to do w/ Coronavirus. Republicans are ready to work w/ Dems on SERIOUS solutions. Now is not the time for politics. Pelosi needs to stop the games & work w/ us.

    Someone needs to tell the Democrats in Congress that CoronaVirus doesn’t care what party you are in. We need to protect ALL Americans!

    House Republicans remain focused on protecting the health of all Americans.

    Speaker Pelosi blocked a necessary provision that will hinder & delay the production of millions of medical masks & respirators required by our medical professionals. Americans want to protect themselves. We must include these respirators in the PREP Act

    America is the best-prepared nation on earth to deal with the coronavirus. As a country, we've made smart moves early—including boosting rapid response funding and stopping travel from China—and now we're all working together to stay prepared.

    Dems delayed on acting on the coronavirus. Instead, they ran ads against Repubs and tried to sneak in provisions that would've delayed vaccine development. Now, days later, we're finally moving ahead to protect Americans.

    Congress should've already passed a funding bill to combat coronavirus. Period. But Democrats are [] on sneaking in elements of their liberal agenda—which would slow down vaccine development and availability. We need CLEAN funding. No gimmicks. No new strings attached.

    What a scam—Speaker Pelosi held up the vote on coronavirus funding so that her campaign team could run ads against Republicans for Super Tuesday. Instead of putting America first, she is putting politics first.

    This one was specifically debunked by Snopes.

    It’s a fight that’s been brewing for quite some time—socialism vs. freedom. I’m ready for it.

    Good news: according to the CDC, coronavirus test kits are expected to be available in every state and local health department across the U.S. by next week.

    That was Feb 28.

    Democrats just voted down a chance to end infanticide and provide babies lifesaving care after they are born, having survived an abortion. 𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙧𝙖𝙙𝙞𝙘𝙖𝙡, 𝙤𝙪𝙩-𝙤𝙛-𝙩𝙤𝙪𝙘𝙝 𝙖𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙙𝙖 𝙞𝙨 𝙘𝙤𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙡𝙞𝙫𝙚𝙨.

    To keep Americans safe from coronavirus: ✔️ Congress has been reinforcing infectious disease readiness for years. ✔️ President Trump has taken preemptive measures, like travel restrictions and quarantines. ✖️ Senator Schumer put out a press release.

    A "one-size-fits-all," government-run health care system would eliminate patients' choices and rob families of innovative cures. America simply can't afford House Democrats' radical, socialist agenda.

    This is the world Republicans live in.

    [–] The coronavirus may hit rural America later — and harder | Rural communities “tend to be older, with more chronic illness,” making people more at risk of severe Covid-19. technical_assistance 32 points ago in politics

    1 in 4 rural hospitals is vulnerable to closure, a new report finds

    But there was one other leading indicator that has an obvious political explanation and which should be entirely avoidable: whether the hospital is in a state that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare.

    According to Chartis, being in a Medicaid expansion state decreases by 62 percent the likelihood of a rural hospital closing. Conversely, being in a non-expansion state makes it more likely a rural hospital will close.

    [–] Trump Says He'll Ignore Key Oversight Provision in Stimulus Bill technical_assistance 21 points ago in politics

    The message wasn’t always easy to deliver. People threw rocks at Carter’s Trump van as he steered through low-income housing projects. At one stop in Philadelphia, an elderly man threatened to beat him with a cane. Often, it was impossible to persuade black voters to support a candidate who had strong backing from white nationalist groups. In those cases, he urged them to simply stay home on Election Day. ...

    In the final weeks of October, Carter’s operation announced a “Don’t Vote Early” campaign designed to convince black voters not to take advantage of early voting, which tended to build up banks of votes for Democrats. Days before the election, Carter and his team made jabs at Clinton for appearing at rallies alongside stars such as Jay-Z and Beyoncé. “We said Hillary Clinton thinks all black people like rap and like to shake their booties,” he recalls. “It’s an insult.” ...

    Nationwide, Trump garnered a higher-than-expected share of black voters, while Clinton won significantly fewer than Obama did four years earlier.

    “Trump vastly outperformed the projection models in the 12 areas Bruce was targeting” in Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Florida, Stockton says. “I never like telling people not to vote. But from a tactical and strategic position, we looked at it: If you could get them to vote for Trump, that was a plus two.” It was a “plus one,” he says, if they simply didn’t vote at all.

    Inside the Pro-Trump Effort to Keep Black Voters From the Polls

    Days before Election day, on Nov. 3, 2016, the Internet Research Agency, according to the indictment, bought an Instagram ad for its "Blacktivist" account that said, "Choose peace and vote for Jill Stein. Trust me, it's not a wasted vote."

    Read the social media posts Russians allegedly used to influence 2016 election cycle

    A few miles away, another prison employee, Crystal Minton, accompanied her fiancé to a friend’s house to help clear the remnants of a metal roof mangled by the hurricane. Ms. Minton, a 38-year-old secretary, said she had obtained permission from the warden to put off her Mississippi duty until early February because she is a single mother caring for disabled parents. Her fiancé plans to take vacation days to look after Ms. Minton’s 7-year-old twins once she has to go to work.

    The shutdown on top of the hurricane has caused Ms. Minton to rethink a lot of things.

    “I voted for him, and he’s the one who’s doing this,” she said of Mr. Trump. “I thought he was going to do good things. He’s not hurting the people he needs to be hurting.”

    Trevor is 41 and dying of liver disease. He lives in a low-income housing facility and he doesn’t have health insurance.

    “Had Trevor lived a simple thirty-nine minute drive away in [Kentucky], he might have topped the list of candidates for expensive medications called polymerase inhibitors, a life-saving liver transplant, or other forms of treatment and support,” Metzl writes. But Tennessee officials repeatedly blocked efforts to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

    But Trevor is not mad at the state’s elected officials. “Ain’t no way I would ever support Obamacare or sign up for it,” he tells Metzl. “I would rather die.” When Metzl prods him about why he’d choose death over affordable health care, Trevor’s answer is telling. “We don’t need any more government in our lives. And in any case, no way I want my tax dollars paying for Mexicans or welfare queens.”

    [–] The coronavirus may hit rural America later — and harder | Rural communities “tend to be older, with more chronic illness,” making people more at risk of severe Covid-19. technical_assistance 26 points ago in politics

    Nissola agrees rural communities might not ever see rates of Covid-19 as high as New York City, but is concerned about their underlying vulnerabilities. More than half of counties in America have no hospital ICU beds, posing a particular risk for the more than 7 million people over the age of 60 living in those places, who are at higher risk of severe cases of Covid-19. ...

    Prior to Friday’s shelter-in-place order, Alaska’s hospitals were predicted to be overloaded by May 14 — spiking to almost six times the hospital capacity by early June. Three months of shelter-in-place would move that date beyond the model’s range of prediction. Any extra time that social distancing buys is critical to manufacture or procure much-needed supplies, or innovate new solutions.

    [–] Republican Attorneys General push forward with lawsuit to dismantle Obamacare despite coronavirus technical_assistance 1 points ago in politics

    Every six months Penny Wingard's doctor in Charlotte, North Carolina, checks her white blood cell count even though she can't afford the tests. After a brutal round of chemotherapy for stage 2 breast cancer in 2014 left her with chemical burns, Wingard has a compromised immune system and no health insurance.

    When she lost that coverage, more medical issues followed: She had a brain aneurysm and then the chemo caused Wingard, 56, to go temporarily blind before she underwent cornea surgery. Her medical debt through all this has ballooned to more than $25,000 — an amount she has no hope of ever paying off as a part-time Lyft driver.

    "You didn't ask for any of this, and you didn't ask to get sick," Wingard said, as her voice broke and she began to cry. "You know, it's not something that you went out there and said, 'Oh, OK,' you know. You didn't ask for any of it. And it is a burden. It really is a burden." ...

    The debate over the coverage gap in the United States is particularly stark in the 14 states — including North Carolina — that didn't expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

    The decision to forgo an increase in state Medicaid programs, an ideological resistance borne of fiscal conservatism in Republican-controlled state legislatures, has left nearly 5 million people across the country without access to health care coverage and meant states turned down billions of federal dollars that would have come with the expansion. ... William Luking, a doctor in rural North Carolina who runs a clinic with his brother about 25 miles north of Greensboro, said he treated one of his regular patients last week who had a dry, hacking cough and trouble breathing. The longtime patient turned scarlet when Luking said he should go to the hospital.

    Amid wheezing and a severe fever, Luking's patient said he couldn't afford that kind of care. He didn't have insurance. ...

    "I had my first good cry with my wife last night)," he told NBC News, pausing as his words got caught in his throat and he began to cry again. "I just cried like a baby, and I told her not one tear was for myself, but I was thinking about all the older folks I've busted it so hard to keep alive and keep thriving day and night for decades. And if this thing really blows in, I'm afraid they're going to be dropping like flies — and that bothers me."

    -Coronavirus challenges states that rejected Medicaid expansion, leaves uninsured with few options

    This is what Republicans do.

    [–] Coronavirus Could Cause Health Premiums to Skyrocket, New Study Finds technical_assistance 1 points ago in politics

    How much premiums are likely to rise is still highly uncertain. Covered California estimates that the nationwide costs related to COVID-19 for commercial plans could range from $34 billion to more than $250 billion. In 2020, premiums would have been between 2 percent and 21 percent higher if those costs had been factored in, according to the analysis. If companies try to make up for the 2020 costs next year, while also budgeting for more pandemic-related spending, premiums could increase anywhere from 4 percent to more than 40 percent across the nation.

    “These increased costs could mean that many of the 170 million Americans in the commercial market may lose their coverage and go without needed care as we battle a global health crisis,” Lee said in a statement that accompanied the analysis. To prevent that from happening, Covered California is calling on Congress to increase assistance to individuals who buy health insurance through individual marketplaces, and to establish a temporary program to limit the costs of COVID-19 for insurers.

    Others are projecting less dramatic cost increases. Edward Kaplan, a senior vice president at Segal, a company that advises clients on health benefits, told the Times, “We think claims are really going to drop off over the next month or two.” He estimated that even in New York, the hardest hit state in the nation, health insurance costs would only increase by 4 to 5 percent.

    John Bertko, Covered California’s chief actuary, argued there is an urgent need for Congress to help stabilize insurance markets. “Given that insurers will be submitting 2021 rates in May and finalizing them around July 1, congressional action is needed very soon in order to affect 2021 premiums,” Bertko said in a statement. “While there is a lot of uncertainty with anything related to COVID-19, one thing we can be certain of is that the impact will be significant, and now is the time to take action.”

    [–] Trump: Quarantine of New York Might Happen Today. Blindsided Governor Cuomo: “I Don’t Even Know What That Means” technical_assistance 43 points ago in politics

    Trump quarantine of New York would accomplish little, experts say

    Trump’s proposal would be even more draconian, and effectively prohibit travel from New York, New Jersey or Connecticut to other states.

    “The energy required to even begin to enforce something like that is probably better spent on core public health response activities,” said Joshua Sharfstein, a public health professor at Johns Hopkins University.

    [–] Senator says White House turned down emergency coronavirus funding in early February technical_assistance 406 points ago in politics

    Trump team failed to follow NSC’s pandemic playbook | The 69-page document, finished in 2016, provided a step by step list of priorities – which were then ignored by the administration.

    “Is there sufficient personal protective equipment for healthcare workers who are providing medical care?” the playbook instructs its readers, as one early decision that officials should address when facing a potential pandemic. If YES: What are the triggers to signal exhaustion of supplies? Are additional supplies available? If NO: Should the Strategic National Stockpile release PPE to states?” ...

    The playbook also repeatedly urges officials to question official numbers about the viral spread. “What is our level of confidence on the case detection rate?” reads one question. “Is diagnostic capacity keeping up?” But across January and much of February, Trump administration officials publicly insisted that their diagnostic efforts were sufficient to detect coronavirus. Officials now privately concede that the administration’s well-documented testing problems have contributed to the outbreak’s silent spread across the United States, and health experts say that diagnostic capacity is only now in late March catching up to the need. ...

    The guide further calls for a “unified message” on the federal response, in order to best manage the American public's questions and concerns. “Early coordination of risk communications through a single federal spokesperson is critical,” the playbook urges. However, the U.S. response to coronavirus has featured a rotating cast of spokespeople and conflicting messages; Trump already is discussing loosening government recommendations on coronavirus in order to “open” the economy by Easter, despite the objections of public health advisers. ...

    The playbook was designed “so there wasn’t piecemeal thinking when trying to fight the next public health battle,” said one former official who contributed to the playbook, warning that “the fog of war” can lead to gaps in strategies.

    [–] Trump: Quarantine of New York Might Happen Today. Blindsided Governor Cuomo: “I Don’t Even Know What That Means” technical_assistance 9 points ago in politics

    Broadly speaking, the CDC has the power to detain people suspected of having a communicable disease, without getting approval from state and local officials. It comes under the public health laws that allow the federal government to impose restrictions either on people coming into the country or traveling from one state to another.

    However, that authority is rarely used, and when it has been invoked, it was directed at individuals and small groups.

    So could it be used to impose a national quarantine?

    Experts on public health law say maybe, but an attempt to do so would likely be challenged in court.

    For one thing, the federal authority is limited to restricting the movement of anyone who "is reasonably believed to be infected with a quarantinable communicable disease." It's not at all certain how that would apply to large groups of people. Under the law, there is no explicit statutory authority for a blanket federal interstate quarantine, only for the isolation of individual people deemed infected.

    Governors and mayors, not the federal government, have the broadest quarantine and isolation authority, as the constitution leaves that kind of police power in the hands of the states.

    Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the authority to detain people suspected of having an infectious disease without getting approval from state and local officials, that authority is rarely used and experts on public health law say that any attempt to leverage that power to create a federally mandated quarantine would likely be challenged in court.

    [–] I Am Hospitalized With the Coronavirus technical_assistance 24 points ago in politics

    I returned home in terrible shape, chest burning and wracked with chills, unable to do anything other than shudder under a blanket. My primary doctor urged my wife to take me to the E.R., which she did. There, they gave me a coronavirus test and another chest X-ray, but blood tests suggested that my oxygen and white blood cell levels were decent. They sent me home but insisted that should I feel worse, I should call them back immediately.

    The next day, my temperature spiked to 103.5 degrees. We called the E.R., and they told us to come back. That night I was admitted to Northern Dutchess Hospital in Rhinebeck, N.Y.

    The first night and day were a literal fever-dream of pricks, prods, scans and sweat. I floated in and out of consciousness and hallucinations as nurses drew blood from all over and gave me shots of blood thinner in my stomach, which became a daily routine. Someone took another chest X-ray.

    On the second day I was more lucid but still felt horrendous, and a friendly doctor came in with two bits of news: The coronavirus test I took in the E.R. had come back positive and the latest X-ray wasn’t good. He showed me the earlier X-ray from the E.R.: Each lung had a cloudy patch near the bottom but was otherwise clear. Then he showed me the new X-ray. It looked liked some demented handyman had sprayed my lungs with insulation.

    It was one of the bleakest moments of the ordeal, surpassed only by the moment when I wondered, as I hugged my 9-year-old daughter goodbye on the way to the hospital, if I would ever hug her again.

    My doctor said we’d stay the course and perhaps add another antibiotic to the mix. But if things didn’t start to turn around soon, he added, I would need to move into the intensive care unit. I lay back, utterly dispirited, and turned on the TV. It was on CNN. President Trump was telling someone he wanted to reopen the country by Easter.

    A few weeks ago I would have rolled my eyes and made a joke about how he should socially distance himself on some Mar-a-Lago golf course. Just go away and let the adults figure things out.

    But my experience has made this pandemic much less abstract, and left me in no mood for jokes. I’m writing this from my hospital bed in Rhinebeck, on Day 14 of my Covid-pneumonia saga. ...

    Every time the president minimizes this crisis, he is making these people’s lives more difficult. When he makes the pandemic seem less serious than it is, he gives those inclined to disregard it license to do so.

    Where are the videos of overflowing hospitals and the dying? They should be on TV day and night, or too many won't take this seriously.

    [–] Trump Says He Told Pence to Ignore Governors in Hard-Hit Areas If They Are ‘Not Appreciative’ technical_assistance 137 points ago in politics

    On Friday, President Donald Trump signed into law a record $2 trillion stimulus bill to help those suffering from the coronavirus pandemic — part of which involves one-time cash payments being sent out to tens of millions of American households.

    But according to The Wall Street Journal, Trump wants those checks to be sent out explicitly in his name.

    “Mr. Trump has told people he wants his signature to appear on the direct payment checks that will go out to many Americans in the coming weeks, according to an administration official,” wrote Siobhan Hughes and Natalie Andrews. “Normally, a civil servant — the disbursing officer for the payment center — would sign federal checks, said Don Hammond, a former senior Treasury Department official.”

    [–] Trump says he's directed Pence not to call governors who aren't 'grateful' for federal aid technical_assistance 12 points ago in politics

    On Friday, President Donald Trump signed into law a record $2 trillion stimulus bill to help those suffering from the coronavirus pandemic — part of which involves one-time cash payments being sent out to tens of millions of American households.

    But according to The Wall Street Journal, Trump wants those checks to be sent out explicitly in his name.

    “Mr. Trump has told people he wants his signature to appear on the direct payment checks that will go out to many Americans in the coming weeks, according to an administration official,” wrote Siobhan Hughes and Natalie Andrews. “Normally, a civil servant — the disbursing officer for the payment center — would sign federal checks, said Don Hammond, a former senior Treasury Department official.”

    [–] Trump says he's directed Pence not to call governors who aren't 'grateful' for federal aid technical_assistance 10 points ago in politics

    I wouldn't call it charm, but Trump did manage to create a death cult around himself, something Romney, Bush, and even Reagan didn't do and couldn't have done. And Flagg had a habit of fucking everything up and getting all his supporters killed.