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    wyldcat

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    [–] Poll: 67% Of US Citizens Don’t Want To Pull Out Of Iran Deal wyldcat 1 points ago in worldpolitics

    Good, only idiots want to pull out of the Iran-deal (looking at you Trump).

    [–] Who didn't say, Merry Christmas? wyldcat 1 points ago in PoliticalHumor

    Gonna save that one, thanks!

    [–] A Urinal in a pub in Ireland wyldcat 0 points ago in PoliticalHumor

    Can someone please the photo to Trump?

    [–] Who didn't say, Merry Christmas? wyldcat 8 points ago in PoliticalHumor

    Bwahaha, nice catch OP! More proof Trump is a hypocrite.

    [–] No-Brainer wyldcat 2 points ago in PoliticalHumor

    Why are you guys such whiny people?

    Not saying you are a Trump supporter, but this goes to all Trump supporters in this thread nagging like little bitches:

    You are free to post anything you want, there are no rules that say "both sides should get equal time". Stop the whining it's just pathetic and shows you guys are triggered as fuck.

    If people don't upvote your post, most likely it's because the majority doesn't find it funny. Move on.

    [–] U.S. Losing Legitimacy as Corruption Fighter, Experts Say wyldcat 3 points ago in politics

    It did. The FBI arrested the one doing the bribing, Mikerin. End of story. The deal itself (which was approved by 16 agencies) is a big yawn. Russia already owned a big stake in the company, the uranium is still in the US and they most likely bought the company to get their assets in Kazakhstan.

    Also funny, I love that you guys use the "Fake news media" whenever it suits you, like when completely biased and proven wrong on multiple times John Solomon writes the articles.

    [–] U.S. Losing Legitimacy as Corruption Fighter, Experts Say wyldcat 2 points ago in politics

    Obama, who also was really popular and respected among other nations in contrast to idiot in the WH now, accomplished a great deal of trust between leaders and raised the US' image abroad since the shameful Bush years. Since day one the Obama administration actually took a series of important steps to combat money laundering, corruption, and tax evasion.

    Your Dotard destroyed that good image in about 10 months by hiring his family members, shills from the oil industry, people with pasts working against their own agencies they are supposed to lead, shady lawyers, corrupt judges, non registered foreign agents, unqualified people (all the way up to the oval office), working together with shady Russians, Mercers etc etc. But most importantly you voted for the most corrupt idiot anyone could vote for, Donald "Mr Money Laundering & Bankruptcy" Trump.

    Here’s a look at the results of the Administration’s efforts, by the numbers.

    Under President Obama:

    From pushing for and passing the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act to cracking down on offshore tax evasion through criminal investigations and prosecutions, the President and his Administration have taken important steps on many fronts that have helped increase transparency in the international financial system and both prevent and punish financial corruption.

    The Department of Justice has charged more than 100 U.S. accountholders that evaded U.S. tax laws using hidden offshore accounts, and nearly 50 individuals who assisted them.

    Due to aggressive law enforcement actions, 80 Swiss banks have admitted to engaging in criminal conduct and paid more than $1.3 billion in penalties. Under threat of prosecution, more than 54,000 individuals have come forward to disclose their offshore accounts, paying more than $8 billion in tax, penalties, and interest.

    Under a law the President signed in 2010, more than 150,000 foreign financial institutions have agreed to report information to the U.S., in an effort to ensure that tax cheats cannot hide assets offshore.

    What role does Congress have to play to combat illegal financial activity? The truth is that bad actors will continue to seek new ways to exploit the financial system for illicit purposes – be it financing terrorism, laundering proceeds from illegal activity such as corruption, evading international sanctions, or evading taxes – and the Administration cannot address these actions through executive steps alone.

    That is why President Obama is calling on Congress to take four critical actions to strengthen what the U.S. can do:

    1. Pass legislation to require “beneficial ownership” transparency: On behalf of the Administration, the U.S. Department of the Treasury is sending a new legislative proposal to Congress that would require all companies formed in the U.S. report information about their beneficial owners to the Department of the Treasury. That step would make information about beneficial owners readily available to law enforcement.

    2. Pass legislation to give law enforcement better anti-corruption tools: We are also seeking legislation to advance our ability to fight corruption both here in the United States and abroad. The new legislative proposals would enhance the ability of our law enforcement officials to obtain information from domestic and foreign banks so they can investigate and prosecute money laundering. This will also allow the Justice Department to prosecute money laundering linked to a broader set of crimes, including ones that involve corrupt public officials.

    3. Approve eight tax treaties: Eight tax treaties have been awaiting Senate approval for several years. Without those treaties, U.S. officials don’t have a complete set of tools to fully investigate and crack down on tax evasion by Americans with offshore accounts, including secret Swiss bank accounts.

    4. Strengthen existing law to improve reciprocal transparency: In 2010, President Obama signed legislation that established the global standard for financial reporting by requiring foreign financial institutions to automatically report to the IRS information about financial accounts held by U.S. persons. But right now, the U.S. doesn’t provide the same information to its partners under this law that they provide to the United States. Congress can strengthen this law by requiring U.S. financial institutions to provide that information to our partners.

    https://www.treasury.gov/press-center/press-releases/Pages/jl0451.aspx

    https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-proposes-legislation-advance-anti-corruption-efforts

    [–] U.S. Losing Legitimacy as Corruption Fighter, Experts Say wyldcat 4 points ago in politics

    And yet they’re not, they’re actual experts.

    Maybe your feelings are the one in the wrong here?

    [–] U.S. Losing Legitimacy as Corruption Fighter, Experts Say wyldcat 55 points ago in politics

    The United States’ position as a global leader in fighting bribery is in danger of seriously eroding, with potentially nasty consequences for clean business dealings around the world.

    Anti-bribery organization Trace International on Thursday released the third edition of its Bribery Risk Matrix, which since 2014 has served as a bribery-risk scorecard. Traditionally clean countries like Sweden, New Zealand, Norway, Finland, and the United Kingdom crowd the top of the list. The United States ranks 16th, behind Germany, Canada, and Hong Kong.

    The U.S. ranking remains about where it was in previous reports, but the global perception is that the United States under the leadership of President Donald Trump no longer puts a premium on fighting bribery and corruption, said Alexandra Wrage, president of Trace.

    Since the late 1990s, “the U.S. has been seen as the engine for this global anti-corruption effort and it is really difficult to watch that being eroded,” Wrage said. “There is a very strong sense that the U.S. is squandering its leadership role on this issue because of the behavior of the administration with respect to conflicts of interest.”

    Those perceptions, she said, are fanned by things like the president profiting from his office — a seeming violation of the Constitution’s emoluments clause.

    Though an increase or decrease in bribery at any level is extremely difficult to measure, Wrage said, the study aims to identify factors that enable it. Those include poor enforcement of laws against bribery, a lack of transparency when it comes to governmental functions and potential conflicts of interest, and factors that might limit the ability of civil society and institutions not only to identify and report corruption, but also to express dissatisfaction through protest.

    Some of those risks seem to be growing in the United States this year. Since taking office, the Trump administration canceled ethics training for White House staff and eliminated an anti-corruption rule meant to make it hard for U.S. energy companies to pay foreign governments. Soon after taking office, Trump reportedly railed against anti-bribery rules for U.S. companies.

    And that, in turn, isn’t helping the fight against bribery and in favor of transparency overseas. When Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen’s son Hun Manith drew criticism for successive appointments as general director of the Defence Ministry’s Military Intelligence Department and a lieutenant general in the Cambodian armed forces, a government spokesman dismissed concerns — by citing the example of the U.S. president.

    “When Donald Trump became president, did he ask all his children to resign from all their businesses and not promote them to have any roles?” he asked a reporter.

    That worries Wrage, who spends about half her year outside the United States trying to beef up standards and rules against bribery.

    “I don’t know how you restore [legitimacy] again once it’s lost,” she said. Before, in other countries, reformers would use U.S. pressure to jump-start their own efforts to fight bribery. “Now, you really do find people rolling their eyes and kind of saying, ‘Who are you to tell us?’”

    “And that has degenerated very rapidly,” Wrage said. “It hasn’t taken long for that to happen.”

    [–] This is Devin Nunes. He claimed to step down from the HIC Russia investigation after he got caught undermining it. Now he's gone rogue, carrying out a shadow investigation on his own trying to derail the real one. wyldcat 3 points ago in MarchAgainstTrump

    Andrew Janz, a Fresno prosecutor, will take on Devin Nunes (R-Visalia) for the District 22nd seat while Emilio Huerta, a Bakersfield-area attorney, will challenge David Valadao (R-Hanford) to represent the 21st District.


    Devin Nunes, the California Republican congressman who sparked a national firestorm as the House Intelligence chairman overseeing the investigation into Russian election meddling, has a challenger.

    Charging voters are “fed up” with Nunes, Fresno County Deputy District Attorney Andrew Janz announced his candidacy Tuesday for California’s 22nd Congressional District seat.

    Janz, a 33-year-old Democrat from the Central Valley city of Visalia, challenges the idea that the GOP-dominated district’s 10-point Republican voter registration advantage or Nunes’ roots in a third-generation dairy farming family shields him from a strong challenge in 2018. Nunes, 43, a Republican from Tulare, was elected to the seat in 2002.

    “The notion that Devin Nunes is unbeatable is a myth,’’ Janz said in an interview Tuesday. “He’s been more concerned about defending himself regarding allegations of misusing classified information than he is with the concerns of the voters here — water, health care and crime. He’s not talking about these things.”

    [–] This is Devin Nunes. He claimed to step down from the HIC Russia investigation after he got caught undermining it. Now he's gone rogue, carrying out a shadow investigation on his own trying to derail the real one. wyldcat 18 points ago in EnoughTrumpSpam

    This is not an isolated incident. It also happens in the Senate Intelligence Committee. Republicans are actively trying to sabotage these investigations in a variety of ways.

    Read more:

    Devin Nunes Went Rogue to Find Out Who Paid for Trump-Russia Dossier, Firm Claims

    Rep. Devin Nunes, the House intelligence committee chairman who claimed to have stepped aside from the panel’s Russia probe, appears to still be unilaterally carrying out a shadow investigation of his own.

    On Friday, the firm behind the dossier alleging Donald Trump’s campaign engaged in a conspiracy with Russia to win the election — and that he witnessed “golden showers” in Moscow — claimed in a federal court filing that Nunes subpoenaed its bank for financial records “that would reveal the identities of Fusion’s clients.” Fusion asked a judge to stop the bank from complying with the subpoena.

    Nunes’s subpoena appears to have caught at least some fellow members of the House intel committee off guard. According to a knowledgeable source, Nunes, a Republican, left several House intelligence committee members in the dark about his subpoena of Fusion. It is unclear if committee Republicans signed off or knew about Nunes’ Fusion GPS subpoena. A source familiar with the investigation told The Daily Beast that committee Democrats only learned of it from reading about it in the press.

    “The subpoena is a blatant attempt to chill both speech with which Mr. Nunes disagrees and the free association of Americans working on a campaign against Donald Trump,” Fusion argues, adding it would violate the firm’s and its clients First Amendment rights.

    Fusion also claims the subpoena bears only Nunes’s signature and means he “unilaterally issued the subpoena in violation of his recusal.”

    Partisan feud undercuts Trump-Russia probe, U.S. Democrats charge

    Democrats on a congressional panel say members of its Republican majority are trying to sabotage an investigation into suspected Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election, raising concerns the two parties will reach contradictory conclusions.

    Republicans on the U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee have coached witnesses, scheduled interviews without first requesting important documents, and many fail to attend witness interviews, four sources close to the investigation said.

    On one occasion, three sources said, Republican Representative Trey Gowdy told Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and White House aide, that he was testifying voluntarily and could leave whenever he liked. After about two-and-a-half hours, one of the sources said, Kushner took the cue and left before Democrats had finished questioning him. Kushner’s lawyer and Gowdy did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

    The panel has heard from about 10 witnesses, the sources said. But given the lack of preparation and the absence of many Republican members, hearings amount to “going through the motions” rather than a serious investigation, one source said.

    Two Republican committee staffers, speaking on the condition of anonymity, also criticized what they called a partisan effort to discredit rather than investigate allegations that some aides or advisers to Republican Trump’s election campaign may have colluded with Russia, which has been under U.S. sanctions for several years.

    The conduct of the probe so far, those staffers and other sources said, threatens to undermine the committee’s reputation for bipartisanship under former Republican chairman Mike Rogers, who led the committee from 2011 to 2015.

    Representative Jackie Speier, a California Democrat, said that while she would like to believe the panel “will come together unified in its conclusions and submit a joint report, I‘m not overly optimistic that this will be the case.”

    Another committee Democrat, Representative Eric Swalwell, said, “That is our North Star, unity and consensus on what happened. Now along the way we’ve seen disruptive behavior that has I think impeded our investigation, and despite that we still are doggedly trying to find out what happened.”

    [–] This is Devin Nunes. He claimed to step down from the HIC Russia investigation after he got caught undermining it. Now he's gone rogue, carrying out a shadow investigation on his own trying to derail the real one. wyldcat 1 points ago in MarchAgainstTrump

    This is not an isolated incident. It also happens in the Senate Intelligence Committee. Republicans are actively trying to sabotage these investigations in a variety of ways.

    Read more:

    Devin Nunes Went Rogue to Find Out Who Paid for Trump-Russia Dossier, Firm Claims

    Rep. Devin Nunes, the House intelligence committee chairman who claimed to have stepped aside from the panel’s Russia probe, appears to still be unilaterally carrying out a shadow investigation of his own.

    On Friday, the firm behind the dossier alleging Donald Trump’s campaign engaged in a conspiracy with Russia to win the election — and that he witnessed “golden showers” in Moscow — claimed in a federal court filing that Nunes subpoenaed its bank for financial records “that would reveal the identities of Fusion’s clients.” Fusion asked a judge to stop the bank from complying with the subpoena.

    Nunes’s subpoena appears to have caught at least some fellow members of the House intel committee off guard. According to a knowledgeable source, Nunes, a Republican, left several House intelligence committee members in the dark about his subpoena of Fusion. It is unclear if committee Republicans signed off or knew about Nunes’ Fusion GPS subpoena. A source familiar with the investigation told The Daily Beast that committee Democrats only learned of it from reading about it in the press.

    “The subpoena is a blatant attempt to chill both speech with which Mr. Nunes disagrees and the free association of Americans working on a campaign against Donald Trump,” Fusion argues, adding it would violate the firm’s and its clients First Amendment rights.

    Fusion also claims the subpoena bears only Nunes’s signature and means he “unilaterally issued the subpoena in violation of his recusal.”

    Partisan feud undercuts Trump-Russia probe, U.S. Democrats charge

    Democrats on a congressional panel say members of its Republican majority are trying to sabotage an investigation into suspected Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election, raising concerns the two parties will reach contradictory conclusions.

    Republicans on the U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee have coached witnesses, scheduled interviews without first requesting important documents, and many fail to attend witness interviews, four sources close to the investigation said.

    On one occasion, three sources said, Republican Representative Trey Gowdy told Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and White House aide, that he was testifying voluntarily and could leave whenever he liked. After about two-and-a-half hours, one of the sources said, Kushner took the cue and left before Democrats had finished questioning him. Kushner’s lawyer and Gowdy did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

    The panel has heard from about 10 witnesses, the sources said. But given the lack of preparation and the absence of many Republican members, hearings amount to “going through the motions” rather than a serious investigation, one source said.

    Two Republican committee staffers, speaking on the condition of anonymity, also criticized what they called a partisan effort to discredit rather than investigate allegations that some aides or advisers to Republican Trump’s election campaign may have colluded with Russia, which has been under U.S. sanctions for several years.

    The conduct of the probe so far, those staffers and other sources said, threatens to undermine the committee’s reputation for bipartisanship under former Republican chairman Mike Rogers, who led the committee from 2011 to 2015.

    Representative Jackie Speier, a California Democrat, said that while she would like to believe the panel “will come together unified in its conclusions and submit a joint report, I‘m not overly optimistic that this will be the case.”

    Another committee Democrat, Representative Eric Swalwell, said, “That is our North Star, unity and consensus on what happened. Now along the way we’ve seen disruptive behavior that has I think impeded our investigation, and despite that we still are doggedly trying to find out what happened.”